1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Poetry tattoos?

Discussion in 'English' started by figgins, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. jilly_mc

    jilly_mc New commenter

    My best friend is a tattooist, I've seen many lines from poems scrawled on people, and I do wonder how or why some of them are chosen...?!

    I would have some or all of the following from The Waste Land:
    What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow
    Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,
    You cannot say, or guess, for you know only
    A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,
    And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,
    And the dry stone no sound of water.

    Maybe all of Sonnet 29:
    When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,
    I all alone beweep my outcast state
    And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries
    And look upon myself and curse my fate,
    Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
    Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,
    Desiring this man's art and that man's scope,
    With what I most enjoy contented least;
    Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
    Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
    Like to the lark at break of day arising
    From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;
    For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings
    That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

    Or for a nice little'un, I wholly agree with 'Dulce et Decorum Est'.

    Maybe the beginning of Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' for something more contemporary, which might pique the kids' interest:
    "Not a red rose or a satin heart.
    I give you an onion."

    And/or you can always look out for the Royal Wedding poem she'll be writing for William and Kate... if that's the kind of thing your students are interested in...?
     
  2. jilly_mc

    jilly_mc New commenter

    Oops, apologies for the lack of line breaks...

    My best friend is a tattooist, I've seen many lines from poems scrawled on people, and I do wonder how or why some of them are chosen...?!



    I would have some or all of the following from The Waste Land:

    What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow

    Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,

    You cannot say, or guess, for you know only

    A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,

    And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,

    And the dry stone no sound of water.



    Maybe all of Sonnet 29:

    When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,

    I all alone beweep my outcast state

    And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries

    And look upon myself and curse my fate,

    Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,

    Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,

    Desiring this man's art and that man's scope,

    With what I most enjoy contented least;

    Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,

    Haply I think on thee, and then my state,

    Like to the lark at break of day arising

    From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

    For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings

    That then I scorn to change my state with kings.



    Or for a nice little'un, I wholly agree with 'Dulce et Decorum Est'.



    Maybe the beginning of Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' for something more contemporary, which might pique the kids' interest:

    "Not a red rose or a satin heart.

    I give you an onion."



    And/or you can always look out for the Royal Wedding poem she'll be writing for William and Kate... if that's the kind of thing your students are interested in...?
     
  3. I have too many scars without adding tattoos, but my choice would be Blake's
    "The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of experience"
     
  4. [​IMG]What a super idea - I'm planning a tattoo and have been thinking of images; now I'm nicking your idea and thinking of a line of poetry or maybe even one from a novel????? Also, the
    idea as a teaching stimulus is great. I teach able disaffected pupils who 'hate poetry' and I'm in process of being glad of holiday to re-group my ideas for the comparison shakespeare / heritage poetry - theme of conflict. I'm going to use the find a line in each war poem and in R+J that you would tattoo so they remember it as a tattoo - even draw it onto their A4 sheet of paper, if you don't mind.Which poems are you using and which images.... if i could be so bold as the others who have asked you to share your resources... though I will continue without your's for KS4. [​IMG]
    lgomer@bgcfl.org.uk
     
  5. Wouldn't have a tattoo but my choice would be from prose: "What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?"
    - George Eliot, Middlemarch

    Could I have the resources too? hex.lawrence@gmail.com

     
  6. Those who stand for nothing will fall for anything.

    Of all the words of tongue or pen, the saddest of all it might have been (I don't think I quoted that correctly, but I think its pretty close.
     
  7. Endlless possibilities here:

    "Chi puo dir com?egli arde, e in picciol fuoco"

    He who can express the ardour of his love, hath but little love to express. (is in a small fire) Now that's poetry!

    -Petrarch

    I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world."--Walt Whitman

    "I want to know beans." - Thoreau's Walden. Not poetry, but just as thrilling.

    "No coward soul is mine" Emily Bronte

    "Anything can happen, child, anything can be." Shel Silverstein

    Todo, como el diamante, antes de luz, es carbon. ? Jose Marti

    If thou of all thy mortal goods bereft,
    And from thy store alone two are left,
    Sell, sell thou one. And with thy toll,
    Buy hyacinth, and speed thy soul. - Muslik-ud-Din


    One of the most poignant, painful and powerful poems ever written, A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes:

    What happens to a dream deferred?

    Does it dry up
    like a raisin in the sun?
    Or fester like a sore--
    And then run?
    Does it stink like rotten meat?
    Or crust and sugar over--
    like a syrupy sweet?

    Maybe it just sags
    like a heavy load.

    Or does it explode?
     
  8. JeanL

    JeanL New commenter


    <table align="CENTER" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td>I took the one less traveled by,</td><td><a name="19">[/URL]</td></tr>
    <tr><td>And that has made all the difference.</td></tr></table>
    Pls send me the resources too!
    jean.lin49004@gmail.com
     
  9. I did something similar earlier this year with a class - worked quite well. They are amazed at how inspirational poetry could be! What I have is very basic but I would be interested in resource swapping to develop the lesson further for the coming year. My email address is ms.mcadden@hotmail.com Thanks in advance!
     
  10. CaptGrimesRetd

    CaptGrimesRetd Occasional commenter

    Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back, wherein he puts alms for oblivion.
     
  11. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    OK, if we're allowed to expland into non-poetry, the OH has just suggested:
    There is no try. Do, or do not.
     
  12. You will love again the stranger who was your self.
    or indeed almost any line from Love After Love - Walcott
     
  13. I taught Margaret Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale' to a sixth form group a few years ago, and one of the girls had the dog latin tag the handmaid finds in her wardrobe tattooed on her back: Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.
    Her mum was delighted.
     
  14. Dear all, I have put together some photos of poetry tattoos alongside the owners' explanations of them. As well of this there is a photo of David Beckham's back with the wording of his tattoos printed underneath.

    If anyone would still like these resources along with a quick idea of how I plan to use them then please fire me an email - nesswatersATyahoo.co.uk - and I will send them on to you.

    Cheers, F.
     
  15. Dear Figgins, Have been fascinated and inspired by all the suggestions and replies for your poetry tattoo idea - please can I have the lesson plan and pictures too. Am excited about trying it with my yr 10 excludees soo....
    Thanks smriley
     
  16. You'll need to let me know your email address.
     
  17. Love your idea, have a v reluctant year 9 boys class and this might get them interested. Can I please have a copy of this as well?
    StephanieReid0910@hotmail.co.uk
     
  18. If I were to get a poetry tattoo I would have:
    Into this wilde Abyss,
    The Womb of nature and perhaps her Grave,
    Of neither Sea, nor Shore, nor Air, nor Fire,
    But all these in thir pregnant causes mixt
    Confus'dly, and which thus must ever fight,
    Unless th' Almighty Maker them ordain
    His dark materials to create more Worlds,
    Into this wilde Abyss the warie fiend
    Stood on the brink of Hell and look'd a while,
    Pondering [her] Voyage.
    from Paradise Lost. It's at the start of Phillip Pullman's "Northern Lights" novel which was a book that really struck a chord with me when I was growing up.
     
  19. millicent_bystander

    millicent_bystander New commenter

    That would hurt!
     

Share This Page