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PMFL - including native speaker child

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by Gemtastic, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Hi all,

    I have been teaching German to LKS2 for 30mmins per week (my own class with more incidental opportunities throughout the week also). This has worked fine but this year I have a bilingual child. I'm after some advice as to how best keep him enjoying the lessons as the other children will be starting from scratch. We'll be getting a German PGCE student for a month for the start of term so I can use her for him while she's here, but apart from that I'm a bit stumped! Obviously I will talk to the child concerned about how he would like to be involved, either as a 'helper' or whether he would like to do something a little more advanced. How have others dealt with this?

    Vielen Dank!
     
  2. Hi all,

    I have been teaching German to LKS2 for 30mmins per week (my own class with more incidental opportunities throughout the week also). This has worked fine but this year I have a bilingual child. I'm after some advice as to how best keep him enjoying the lessons as the other children will be starting from scratch. We'll be getting a German PGCE student for a month for the start of term so I can use her for him while she's here, but apart from that I'm a bit stumped! Obviously I will talk to the child concerned about how he would like to be involved, either as a 'helper' or whether he would like to do something a little more advanced. How have others dealt with this?

    Vielen Dank!
     
  3. Geekie

    Geekie Occasional commenter

    I had a native Spanish pupil for 2 years in Y5 and Y6. When she arrived at the beginning of Y5 she had no English at all, and most Spanish lessons she did her ESOL support work with the visiting LA person. The class teacher also took the opportunity to do some extra work with her too. But your is already bilingual! If the child has weaknesses in numeracy, for example, it's useful to be able to work on that via the other language as well. Similarly, although the child is bilingual, their writing in the other language may need work, and so would benefit from doing the structured writing activities that the others do. You're right that having them as a helper is a good idea.
     
  4. Thanks for the reply. He's born here and fine in both languages, he's in my top group for pretty much everything, bless him! Turns out he wants to be in the lessons at the same pace as the other chn, he's worried about being 'different' because he think's 'his' German if different from that which others speak, accent possibly? Will start him off on that basis and see if I can get him to enjoy the fact he's got a gift throughout the year! :)
     
  5. Where are his parents (or the German speaking parent) from? Perhaps they speak a certain dialect? And he's not really used to people speaking German to him (apart from at home), so perhaps he's got the opinion from watching German TV, where people usually speak High German?
     

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