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Please support the On Line Petition re Adult Bullying in Schools

Discussion in 'Governors' started by grrmummy, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. montiagh

    montiagh New commenter

    grrummy - tom clancy is correct the Governance team at Darlington numbers only 4 or 5. They simply cannot investigate complaints properly. Some say they are not fit for purpose. Any complaint to them results in them simply writing to the chair and no further investigation will occur. If you are very unhappy with any response, you have the right to audience and further investigation by a deputy director of education, but this is likely to rubberstamp what has already been decided . Hence you are right to push your petition. Problem is those who have not been shafted in schools will not show a great deal of support to a very valid aim.
     
  2. grrmummy

    grrmummy New commenter

    I don't. And this is entirely the point.
    The complaint itself is very complex and sections 496 and 497 of the Education Act apply. The Secretary of State has powers of intervention but - despite his recent criticisms of GB's such as has been my experience with this school - will he actually use them?
    Sadly I doubt it. Politics prevail and no doubt the 'only one case' argument will enter the equation.
    But is that an excuse to do nothing?
    Put simply why is so much public money being spent telling people they have a right to a fair hearing when they raise concerns about a school - when quite simply - they don't. And why do school officials profess to challenge and address bullying in schools when they actively promote such practices themselves?
    [​IMG]
     
  3. montiagh

    montiagh New commenter

    I would bet a large some of money that if the Dfe were asked a question via the Freedom of Information act of how many cases of complaint in the last five years that encompassed sections 496 & 497 have they ruled in favour of the complainant the answer will be zero.
    So they have in my view the power under sections 496 & 497 to find in favour of the complainant but do not. A recent case of a governor being bullied in a fashion ended up in the High Court and the claimant won. The claimant was forced to go via the courts as the dfe refused to take action. It later transpired that the school withheld crucial information from the Dfe in their investigations. The truth came out in court via the Information Commissioners Office demanding that the evidence be realeased from the Local Authority. The Dfe confirmed that they agreed that the evidence was withheld from them and that had that evidence been provided to them they would have come to a different conclusion.
    The Dfe were then asked what were they going to do about a school that duped them and caused great cost to the public purse and no response and deadly silence was the outcome.
    I believe cases like this are rare. Some will say that as they are rare who cares and nothing else needs to be put in place to protect those adults in schools like governors who are bullied. They are the ones who have never experienced matters which can wreck their lives.
    Perhaps if the Dfe did their job properly, petitions like yours would not be needed.




     
  4. grrmummy

    grrmummy New commenter


    Thank you.
    Sometimes it is more about being true to your values than about 'winning' [​IMG]
    And anyone who really cares about governace knows that it is also about raising educational standards in schools than defending the indefensible.
     
  5. grrmummy

    grrmummy New commenter


    Thank you.
    Sometimes it is more about being true to your values than about 'winning' [​IMG]
    And anyone who really cares about governance knows that it is also about raising educational standards in schools than defending the indefensible.
     

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