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Please help!

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by cat86, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. I have a child in my class (year 1) who is incredibly disruptive. She has been disruptive all year but has improved dramatically in the past few months. However, she is not reverting back to her previous behaviour, screaming blue murder for no reason, looses control, and cannot deal with situations in a calm manner. All my previous techniques, positive reinformcent, home-school contract book, time outs etc, have now stopped working.
    I am a total loss as to what to do next todela with her in class. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. I have a child in my class (year 1) who is incredibly disruptive. She has been disruptive all year but has improved dramatically in the past few months. However, she is not reverting back to her previous behaviour, screaming blue murder for no reason, looses control, and cannot deal with situations in a calm manner. All my previous techniques, positive reinformcent, home-school contract book, time outs etc, have now stopped working.
    I am a total loss as to what to do next todela with her in class. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. Have you spoken to her parents/ carers to find out if there's something at home that caused her to revert to her old behaviour?
     
  4. In contact with mum each day about behaviour and she sees an educational psychologist. I just need some new techniques to help her control herself and to help the screaming as it distress the other children as well.
     
  5. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    I think that, sad though it may be, your priority at this stage is to contain and isolate her from the rest of the class, because if she continues at the rate she's going, she'll seriously damage the education of everyone else, plus erode the quality of your teaching and ultimately your mental health. While I appreciate that this might go against the grain- after all, we never like to concede that we can't always help- I'm afraid that this should be the first goal. Utilitarian strategies are rarely edifying, but often necessary. Also don't forget that, try as we might, some behaviours will always be resistant to the strategies of the classroom teacher, and she need more specialist support. Hopefully not.
    If you allow her to explode and disrupt them not only does she formally damage the lesson, but she models behaviour for others to emulate, and I practically guarantee that others will imitate her, or attempt to corner the same levels of attention that she accrues whenever she throws her toys out the pram.
    So make sure that you (and your TA?) have strategies ready in place for whenever she approaches Defcon 1: have her removed to a prearranged place, away from attention and community, until she calms down. With luck, she'll start to realise that her misbehaviour will result in isolation, and learn to avoid incurring that sanction. Additionally, I would advise that you start down a more punitive route with her in general. Time outs and positive reinforcement are great tools, but they're not omni-useful. Some jobs require a hammer, not a feather duster. So make sure that every time she kicks off, she also misses playtime, or something similar that she can grasp as punitive. If all she ever gets from her teacher is encouragement and praise, then she'll never learn that some things are forbidden, and not merely not-rewarded.
    Good luck to you.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  6. Thank you very much. I have been feeling very stressed out with the whole situation and decided yesterday to come down really harsh on her so she realises screaming gets her nowhere. Thanks for the advice!
     

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