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Please help with how to teach visualising 3D objects from 2D drawings.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by taspat, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Hi

    I'm a trainee teacher and I'm going to be observed teaching year 4 children in Numeracy. The objective is I can visualise 3D objects from 2D drawings.
    For the main activity, I'm going to give the children pictures of models made from interlocking cubes and they will predict how many cubes are needed to make the model and then they will check by making them (easier models for LA and more difficult models for HA). After they have done this, they will predict how many more cubes are needed to make the model into a cube and then they will make it to check. The children will work in pairs. For the extension activity, one child will make a model and they will have to describe to their partner how to put it together without showing it to them. In the plenary, the children will play an interactive count the cubes game.

    What I need help with is how to teach and explain to the children what they are going to be doing before they go off and do the activity. I was thinking of having the children on the carpet, showing them some easy model images to start of with, get them to predict and then send them off to their tables to make it and check. But I'm worried that this is not going to be enough to make them understand. Could somebody please help me with how I could explain this activity to the children and how to teach them visualising 3D objects from 2D drawings?
     
  2. Hi

    I'm a trainee teacher and I'm going to be observed teaching year 4 children in Numeracy. The objective is I can visualise 3D objects from 2D drawings.
    For the main activity, I'm going to give the children pictures of models made from interlocking cubes and they will predict how many cubes are needed to make the model and then they will check by making them (easier models for LA and more difficult models for HA). After they have done this, they will predict how many more cubes are needed to make the model into a cube and then they will make it to check. The children will work in pairs. For the extension activity, one child will make a model and they will have to describe to their partner how to put it together without showing it to them. In the plenary, the children will play an interactive count the cubes game.

    What I need help with is how to teach and explain to the children what they are going to be doing before they go off and do the activity. I was thinking of having the children on the carpet, showing them some easy model images to start of with, get them to predict and then send them off to their tables to make it and check. But I'm worried that this is not going to be enough to make them understand. Could somebody please help me with how I could explain this activity to the children and how to teach them visualising 3D objects from 2D drawings?
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Can they have cubes on the carpet? Use the IWB to show pictures needing up to 20 cubes or similar and give each child that number when they come to the carpet to start. Demonstrate a couple while they have their cubes on the floor in front of them and then let them have a few goes. then send them off.

    Sounds a good and practical lesson, hope it goes well.
     
  4. Thank you for your reply!

    Im just concerend that the children could fidget with the cubes and not pay attention but then at the same time it would be good to let the chn make the models when they are on the carpet because it would let me quickly assess which children are struggling. I think I will go with your suggestion. What could I do if most of the children don't understand?
     
  5. sueemc

    sueemc New commenter

    I've taught this with washing machine boxes and made up a technique called 'walk the shape' however, it's really stand in the middle of the shape then build around you.. after modelling with huge boxes (comet will give you some for free).. I get a child to stand in the middle of the flattened box and then helpers build around.. it helps if as many children as poss can get a go in the box .
    then I demo doing from a 2d drawing.. we talk about where we would stand (a square etc with other bits attached) and imagine pulling up the sides around us.. it works altho might sound a bit wacko
    I guess to make it even better you could use some little lego men on the paper to show where to stand and really imagine pulling up the sides (and chn imagine they are the lego man)
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Experience tells me that most of the children will understand. this isn't one of those concepts you have to explain in 56 different ways and then cross your fingers.

    As you say you can see on the carpet who is struggling and who not. Can you keep the strugglers on the carpet for a while longer when you send most of them off, to continue to work with them for a few more goes? A little bit of your attention will almost certainly sort them out.

    Enjoy, it is a fun lesson to teach.
     
  7. Hi, where did you get the pictures/models of the interlocking cubes from?

    I am teaching this lesson this week and they sound spot on for what I need?

    Cheers
     
  8. cricketgirl

    cricketgirl New commenter

    Does your school have the software program Multe-Maths? You can click and drag images of multi link cubes on the page so that they make a 3D model, then pull them apart so show how the model is constructed. I used this last week with Year 5 and they enjoyed making a variety of 2D images as challenges for their partners to make the 3D version with real multi-link cubes!
     

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