1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Please help..problems with teaching assistant

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by symt, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. I am an nqt (qualified in 2009) and recently secured a teaching post. My nqt year will start in september. The school asked me to do supply work for them starting June. Today was my first day and I found the teaching assistant to be very rude and disruptive. The class is very disruptive so it doesn't help when I have someone whose not supportive. I want to know what you think. I was doing a lesson and the TA would just butt in and ask the children questions whilst I was doing my intro. When someone came into ask me how I was getting on the TA all of a sudden just said this table is really messy. She was talking about the table I was on during an activity (no table is tidy during a lesson). To make it worse she would correct me (when there was nothing wrong) each time I stopped the children or made a decision. How do I deal with such a person? I kept my cool today but cannot put up with such rudeness for the next seven weeks. I was thinking about talking to he. Any advice???
     
  2. I am an nqt (qualified in 2009) and recently secured a teaching post. My nqt year will start in september. The school asked me to do supply work for them starting June. Today was my first day and I found the teaching assistant to be very rude and disruptive. The class is very disruptive so it doesn't help when I have someone whose not supportive. I want to know what you think. I was doing a lesson and the TA would just butt in and ask the children questions whilst I was doing my intro. When someone came into ask me how I was getting on the TA all of a sudden just said this table is really messy. She was talking about the table I was on during an activity (no table is tidy during a lesson). To make it worse she would correct me (when there was nothing wrong) each time I stopped the children or made a decision. How do I deal with such a person? I kept my cool today but cannot put up with such rudeness for the next seven weeks. I was thinking about talking to he. Any advice???
     
  3. Pennyforyourthoughts

    Pennyforyourthoughts Occasional commenter

    You need to talk to your HOD and ask if this is normal for this TA if so ask how the other teacher managed her. Also ask for the guidelines for what TAs are expected and not expected to do in the classroom within that department. If she is attached to only one child ... in which case why did she leave the room. If not then ask for a clear job description for her role within the classroom and then agree with her how she will be deployed during your lessons.
    Of course she could have been employed to teach the class over the past weeks months and finding she is now not needed......... possibly not earning the extra money that she may have received for teaching the class. I suggest find out more.
     
  4. That sounds really hard. I would suggest arranging a time to talk to the TA regarding these issues.
    I would start by saying that you're looking forward to working with her, sharing ideas, etc (start positive),
    Then move on to say that you feel that she is sometimes undermining you when you are teaching. Ask her to pass on any comments she has when the children are not around, as you are happy to receive constructive critisism, but feel that it is unprofessional to do this in front of the children.
    Advise her that you welcome her experience as you are new to this class and school, but would prefer if she didn't undermine you in front of the children or other members of staff.
    Then wrap it up with something positive again - maybe mentioning something you've noticed that she is good at?
    Good luck with the situation. I think some TAs feel threatened by a new teacher and may be testing you (in the same way that the children will) to find out your boundaries.

     
  5. It's probably not the best idea to actually name schools on here! You never know who's reading it and in my opinion it's not very good practice. Sorry to sound like a bossy and opinionated person - I'm not normally.
     
  6. Oh. I'm going to get my coat and leg it out the room. Just realised you hadn't put the name of the school. I'm sorry sorry sorry sorry sorry sorry sorry sorry soz, apologise, grovel, on my knees, I beg your pardon...and other words to that effect.[​IMG]
     
  7. What a sad sad state of affairs when people are given too much power.
     
  8. Thank you all for your advice. Newlook, the school is not in Rawtenstall, Lancashire but the staff sound similar to that school. I was told by someone else that apparently it's common practice at this school for teaching assistants to butt in, and what's worse is if you complain the HT sides with the TA's even though theres no such thing in their contract which states they take part in teaching. I'm dreading being with a worse TA [​IMG]. I did have a word with my TA and she was alot better today so lets hope it stays that way.
     
  9. Be firm and confident! She seems obviously jealous and you need to have a quiet word with her. She seems intent on destroying your confidence but put her on the spot when you talk to her one to one!
    Question her as to why she likes undermining and sabotaging your lessons?
    Put her on the spot! She is a bully and all bullies MUST be confronted with their bullying behaviour... be brave!
     
  10. i had trouble this week with a bad ta, she stood out because the others were so amazing, write a report and hand it to the TA manager, its not the hod's issue and i dont think its our place to confront her, we're there for the kids. but that is my opinion. i did a report and the ta has been spoken to.
     
  11. sorry to hear this. to be absolutely honest, as teacher with 11 years experience, still get this - on supply or contracts.
    best thing is to ignore - and not let her ruffle you. if she's interrupting, halt class, and ask for silence off 'everyone' (i.e. her as well), and do it again and again to make point.
    if she continues to interrupt, i.e reprimand kids on carpet - ask her to do it with symbols, or by quietly reaching across and tapping child and reprimanding with warning cards round her neck - so flow of lesson isn't interrupted - but, before you do this - go and tell a member of smt you are going to use these strategies - either, as she will know it is aimed at her and be cross.
    it is always better to go to smt with a solution in hand - as smt don't like to deal with stuff like this as it involves politics and personalities. if you got to a member of smt and explain disruption, and how you intend to deal with it - you've forewarned all.

    if you get negative response - consider looking elsewhere for post - maybe just do a year there. not all TA's are like this and it could wreck confidence if you let it.
    best thing generally is to ignore, and really focus on your part of job. then she'll get no reaction and get cross, then bored. maybe, sometimes, this happens when previous teacher was either excellent, or very poor or absent (usually stress!), rarely middle ground. if it was stress, ta's can realise power they have to complain etc and make trouble for teachers. so you must go to a member of smt as the issue needs highlighting by somebody else.
    last resort is start shipping her out to do other jobs during carpet times! but problem with this is that TA's can then get into habit of dipping out of class ***** nilly - so you may have to timetable her presence, which goes down like lead balloon, and is again something management should be involved with.
    managing ta's can be most difficult part of the job i'm afraid. some are just fab, but others...

     
  12. vuvuzela

    vuvuzela New commenter

    ME - TEACHER. YOU - ASSISTANT.
    That should do it.
     
  13. The TA in question may, of course, think in some strange way that she is being helpful to a new member of staff. She may also be being rude but in this situation, I can see how the two could be easily confused.
    I've had several TAs like this - worst when they ahve a colleague in the room and they can exchange "eye rolling" glances at each other whilst you are teaching!
    When I experienced a similar situation, I did speak to the TA one-to-one and thanked her enthusiastically for her input in lessons and how this is really supporting the children (heavily tongue in cheek). HOwever, I also pointed out shouting it out does distract some children from me (which is where their attention should be!) and also distracts me, the teacher. So, I asked her if we could find a way where she could still contribute her knowledge to help the children learn without shouting out etc? I suggested (as she seemed to enjoy 'picking me up' on what she considered factual inaccuracies in what I said) that I'd tell her what work was coming up for the coming week, and she would have to make a word bank for the whole class on a flip chart for each topic that week, and I would give her 5 minutes towards the beginning of the lesson to talk through the word bank with the children and then the lesson would continue.
    That way she was getting her input and 'being teacher' (which is what she really wanted) and our roles were clarified.
    It all worked quite well until she realised that the children would shout out over her whilst she was trying to talk them through the word bank and she struggled with this. (I admint I didn't help much here). After a few weeks of this, she quietly came to see me and ask if I'd "do" the word bank each day as she couldn't cope with the children shouting out and not listening. I didn't have to say "Now do you see how I felt?!". She knew. And I never heard a peep out of her again in lessons, except talking quietly to children to recap.

     
  14. You must be a fantastic teacher to come up with an idea like this! Love the way you dealt with the situation and will remember your advice.
    I am an NQT Secondary Teacher but am on day to day supply. I once worked in a school where the TA's sat in my lesson and rolled their eyes at every single thing I said. I heard them saying things like "Mrs So and So doesn't usually say that" "Mrs So and So doesn't usually do that" and so on. I really wanted to ask them if Mrs-whats-her-name had ever told them to shut the hell up!!
    Instead I smiled and walked over to them in the middle of my lesson with all the pupils watching and said, "If you think that I'm doing something wrong then it's better for you to tell me about it rather than each other. I'm just the Supply Teacher and I'm only here for one day. I don't know about all of your routines because no one has given me a timetable or bothered to tell me". They were so shocked that I'd actually confronted them about it they shut up straight away but became much more helpful.
    Not sure if it was right thing to do but it made me feel great!! [​IMG]
     
  15. LOL! Go you! Nice assertiveness! All the "eye rolling" and "sighing" and "tutting" and "smirking" to each other across the classroom drives me mad and makes me wonder - are these adults we are working with, or are they kids who've never really grown out of school?! (BTW, I know that such TAs are a minority and most are great - but the minority get themselves notice!)
     
  16. I've had that today, been in this school since start of March as the normal TA was on long term sick leave. My TA hours have been reduced accordingly but I still teach. She rubbed me up the wrong way ages ago when dropoing her child off at school she "reminded" me to put some easy times tables out for the "poorer children" - oh really? I've never have thought of that -.-

    Today I've had the pleasure of working with her, she's best friends with the 1-2-1 support in their, and worked with the regular teacher for 20 odd years or something random like that.

    For today I was given a photocopy of a "100 literacy lessons" where the fab interactive idea was to get children to recount what they did on a weekend morning which was then to be marked and levelled and APP'd to death. /yawn. Part of the plan was to model writing on the board, so I jazzed mine up a bit (as I'd done sod all over the weekend) and said that I'd seen an alien and was to recount what had happened. The start of the lesson was a cracking success, highly enthused children, masses of wow vocabulary, great use of connectives and time connectives.

    She then pipes up from the teachers desk and chair "This is supposed to be a recount, not an adventure". I was gobsmacked, this was just the introduction to the lesson, it was a recount (last time I checked recounts didn't have to be solely on a morning of watching tv) I can't believe she butted into my lesson and said what she did. How rude! Half the class had watched tv all weekend anyway!

    As a consequence the final pieces of work were terrible, I had one child in tears as she couldn't remember what she did over the weekend, and one child wtih SEN who was so enthusiastic before has done precisely nothing for the rest of the morning.

    I'm absolutely furious!

     
  17. You send them out of the room. Simply say, "Mr. or Mrs, please step into the hallway until I can speak to you privately. If they ask you why? Say, "Because I said so!" Then you have a choice. You either are the manager of the classroom or she or he is. Rude people like this need to be told what you expect in a straight forward manner. If it continues go to the principal. Your assistant can grade papers in the hall if necessary.
     
  18. A pointy finger, bulging eyes, lots of swearing and threatening to kick her face off will probably do the trick. Worked for me everytime :D
     
  19. ............and if she tells anyone, you will give her a "bogwash"
     

Share This Page