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Please Help! Primary PE and Behaviour

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by Katie80, May 20, 2011.

  1. Katie80

    Katie80 New commenter

    Could someone please, please help with an ongoing, worsening problem I have? I take a class of Y4 pupils for 45 minutes of PE once a week. There are lots of boys in the class, and at least 9 of them have problems with behaviour. This has encouraged others to play up too.
    I'm at my wits end about what to do with them that will engage them enough to get through effective lessons safely. Every week I give them instructions which they do not listen to/actively disobey/carry on through. I've tried highlighting good work, praising improvements in behaviour, thinking up fun activities, giving warnings, time outs, and twice have stopped a pupil from taking part in the entire lesson. I asked them what their favourites games are, and told them that they can play one at the end of the lesson if they behave well, but that doesn't work. The bad behaviour is constant. For example: if they are asked to walk/jog/run round hall they bunch into groups and start to carry on. If I put them into teams to play a game, they swap places and I end up with uneven teams, even if I make them stand in different corners of the room as I divide them up. If I make anyone take time out they dash out of where I've put them when I am loooking elsewhere, shout out to others, make sillly noises etc. I have no adult support, and management take a totally hands off approach. I usually only have half an hour in the hall with them by the time we get over there, and I need to come up with a way of making them take part safely and sensibly in activities, so that they are getting physical exercise. I don't think it's good to make them take timeouts too much, and some of them are looking for that anyway. It's a fairly small gym hall, and there are very limited opportunities to take them outside.

    Can anyone give me some advice, please? I dread PE, we don't get through lessons and last week I had to stop the lesson and take them back to class to write out the safety rules, because they got so out of hand. Sorry for the rant, and thanks for reading.
     
  2. Katie80

    Katie80 New commenter

    Could someone please, please help with an ongoing, worsening problem I have? I take a class of Y4 pupils for 45 minutes of PE once a week. There are lots of boys in the class, and at least 9 of them have problems with behaviour. This has encouraged others to play up too.
    I'm at my wits end about what to do with them that will engage them enough to get through effective lessons safely. Every week I give them instructions which they do not listen to/actively disobey/carry on through. I've tried highlighting good work, praising improvements in behaviour, thinking up fun activities, giving warnings, time outs, and twice have stopped a pupil from taking part in the entire lesson. I asked them what their favourites games are, and told them that they can play one at the end of the lesson if they behave well, but that doesn't work. The bad behaviour is constant. For example: if they are asked to walk/jog/run round hall they bunch into groups and start to carry on. If I put them into teams to play a game, they swap places and I end up with uneven teams, even if I make them stand in different corners of the room as I divide them up. If I make anyone take time out they dash out of where I've put them when I am loooking elsewhere, shout out to others, make sillly noises etc. I have no adult support, and management take a totally hands off approach. I usually only have half an hour in the hall with them by the time we get over there, and I need to come up with a way of making them take part safely and sensibly in activities, so that they are getting physical exercise. I don't think it's good to make them take timeouts too much, and some of them are looking for that anyway. It's a fairly small gym hall, and there are very limited opportunities to take them outside.

    Can anyone give me some advice, please? I dread PE, we don't get through lessons and last week I had to stop the lesson and take them back to class to write out the safety rules, because they got so out of hand. Sorry for the rant, and thanks for reading.
     
  3. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    How many PE sessions do they have a week? You take one. They should have two. Does someone else take them?
    Don't ever bribe them with their favourite game. You tell them exactly what they need to do and they follow that.
    Why are you not taking them outside? The only limit to this is 'is it raining'. Get them out as much as possible (unless the plan calls for gym or dance).
    Is there a PE map? Do the kids know how the units change over the course of the year? Do they get to play in regular comps or fixtures?
    The number one behaviour management tool are the words 'you're not in the team'. Behaviour in PE and all other lessons equals the opportunity to represent the school at sport.
    You must be confident in yourself or things will go wrong. Without pre-judging poor behaviour is often the result of poor planning and delivery. Kids bounce off enthusiasm.
     
  4. Katie80

    Katie80 New commenter

    Hi, thanks for the reply. AHT (with support) takes them for the other lesson. Don't go outside because of weather (very wet part of country). I take on board your comments about not offering the incentive of a game at end, and that it's probably my poor planning and delivery that is causing the problem. Will go back to the drawing board and try, try, try again.
     
  5. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    Difficult to know what specific advice to give/where to start without seeing you in action with this class, or without knowing the class and what they are normally like.
    Are you their class teacher? what are they like in other lessons? Are you an inexperienced teacher?
    When you say an AHT, do you mean Assistant Head Teacher? how well does this person get on teaching the group? is it possible for you to observe or team teach with them to pick up some ideas?
    If it is an Assistant Head Teacher, they should be supporting you and giving you advice. In fact a number of people should (Head of Year, your Line manager etc).
    You sound like you are not comfortable teaching PE anyway and the kids are probably picking this up. Some of the things you describe are fairly extreme and need to be 'nipped'
    To be honest it sounds like a riot. Regardless of whether or not it is your fault, Senior management should be stepping in and dealing with the ringleaders.
     
  6. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    I disagree
    This would only work in certain schools/certain classes/certain kids.
    I think in most state school situations most kids wouldn't be bothered.
    Those who do represent the school are probably into their PE and not misbehaving anyway.
     
  7. njs1999

    njs1999 New commenter

    Yes! After teaching for quite a few years, I have finally found the answer to any behavioural problems in my lessons!
    Perhaps you should run seminars on this!! [​IMG]
     
  8. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    This approach requires a total overhaul of PE in schools.
    First and foremost there must be regular fixtures. Secondly there must be A and B team fixtures. Kid aspire to play in the A team. Good behaviour in the whole school is a requirement of A team status. A lot of the time the ones misbehaving are the very able pupils who would play in an A team.
    You can also add in sports tours / trips. Again if you misbheave and lose the teacher's trust you don't go. They have the opportunity to earn that trust back. Very KIPP like approach but works.
     
  9. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    £300 per day. [​IMG]
     
  10. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    I still disagree
    This is merely a more detailed version of what you said before. It is still wrong. I don't know what schools you have been working in but this approach is not a '1 size fits all' and will only work in a school where:
    a) Sport is seen as having high importance by every child in the school
    b) All children who are misbehaving actually want to represent the school
    c) If a child stops misbehaving you have a place for them on the team (ie if the child is low ability and stops misbehaving are you actually going to put them in your team? If so at whose expense?)
    I work in a school approaching this scenario (a and b) but doubt if it would work.
     
  11. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    In the scenario given by the OP she states there are around 9 boys misbehaving. Would you put all 9 in your team if they behaved?
    What if it was a 3 form entry and each class had 9 badly behaved boys? Would you give all 27 places on a school team?
    What would you do if a handful of children in year 1 misbehaved - do we have teams for year 1?
    Fundamantally flawed solution, sorry.
    This would not work for the OP
     
  12. njs1999

    njs1999 New commenter

    I must inform the principal at my school to book you for the next inset we have to sit through at the start of the year!
    "Right everybody, stop trying to build positive relationships with pupils! Just tell them they won't play for the school team!"
    Ahahahaha!! What a clown!

     
  13. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Every school is different.
    If the boys in the OP's case that are misbehaving are in fact sports players outside of school, then a structured school competition programme would be the way forward. State schools have lost the whole 'first team' ethos.
    For other children it may be a different approach. But overall a school has to clamp down on bad behaviour and reward good behaviour, be this a trip, outing etc.
    Read the KIPP book. Every week they give the kids 'KIPP' dollars. Every few months they arrange a trip. They tell the kids whether they can come or not on the trip a couple of weeks before. If there has been bad behaviour they say sorry you can't come as you have lost our trust. However they make it clear how that child can win their trust back and set targets for their behaviour, so that they can go on the next trip.
    Bottom line is that misbehaviour in PE is down to poor PE planning and poor teaching. A group of boys, who maybe play football every week out of school, should be thriving in PE. Even when it is not football these boys should be competing with each other to see who is the fastest, strongest etc. Competition is lost in the state school prizes for all culture.
     
  14. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Lots of what ifs.
    Different strategies work for different years. An 'well done' sticker will motivate Year 1 but not Year 6. It's about having different opportunities for all year groups.
    Each school should have a house competition. Again this is where 'you're not playing' is important. As you can structure the points system so that each house gets points for the players they field. Don't play, no points, feel the wrath of your house mates upset they have lost points.
    We are not competitive enough. Kids, especially boys, thrive on competition. Isn't this what all this 'being boy friendly teaching style' is all about?
     
  15. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    You may not agree with what I say, and I may not agree with you, but I don't stoop so slow to call you a clown.
    Says a lot about your character and I feel sorry for your pupils.
     
  16. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    I won't stoop to the insults of the other poster, but I will say that you meander a lot in many of your arguments/comments. This often borders on contradicting yourself.
    In one breath you imply that THE answer is to say that 'you can't play for the team' then you say 'not all schools are the same' when I comment that this will not always work.
    I don't know what KIPP is and don't have any intention to find out. Sounds like another 'new' (ie remanufactured) idea which is promoted as the answer to all problems.
    Again you contradict yourself. In other threads you have said a JDI approach should be taken (Just do it) to PE and now you suggest going into 'rewards and sanctions' programmes.
    I know I am not stupid, and often find it difficult to grasp what you are really trying to say.
    By the way bad behaviour isn't always down to bad planning and teaching, sometimes it's down to some kids being inately bad regardless of who is teaching them.
     
  17. Katie80

    Katie80 New commenter

    I don't think I was very clear in my original post, but I was very upset. First of all, I have been teaching for several years, but I'm not a confident teacher, and no, I'm not comfortable teaching PE. I seem to focus on the behaviour too much, rather than let the lesson itself catch their attention and reduce the bad behaviour. Stopwatch gave me some excellent advice for a set of lessons earlier in the year, and they actually worked really well. I think I need to consider what made those lessons more successful, and try to incorporate the positives from those.
    I quite agree that poor teaching generally causes poor behaviour. Also, I only work part-time which doesn't help. The AHT has problems too, although I think his position of authority helps him a bit - he is the person these pupils' parents come to see when their behaviour gets too out of hand. The bad behaviour also occurs with other teachers who are in. I have 2 pupils with ADHD, 5 others with IEPs and a selection of other difficulties. Interestingly the behaviour issues are confined to the boys. 7 pupils have been on behaviour cards since Christmas.
    I will revisit my planning, and look at what I did when I followed Stopwatch's advice. I also think that the points people made about boys and competitiveness are important. We have few inter-school challenges (behaviour is a probolem throughout KS2), but I could make my lessons involve more competitiveness.
    Thanks for the good advice I have received.
     
  18. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    yes, lots of 'what ifs'
    Your comments suggesting being banned from representative sport is the best answer for bad behaviour were the catalyst for these.
    Again I can't actually grasp what you are trying to say or where you are coming from.
    I am not actually sure you can either.
     
  19. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I think you are trying to make this more complicated than it is.
    Every school should be involved in a sports competition programme. It is however a privilege to play for the school and wear the school colours. Should a pupil not be worthy of wearing the school colours they don't play.
    For some pupils this might not have much impact, they may not want to play sport for the school. Therefore another sanction is needed. But for the pupil who loves sport and wants to play for the school it is an appropriate sanction.
    The boys in the OPs lesson will be thinking 'why should I behave?'. The school should have a behaviour policy which requires them to behave full stop in the first place, but they need an added incentive as well (fixtures, tournaments, sports tours etc).
     
  20. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    It's the athletics season now. Mark out a 10m sprint area and get them doing shuttle runs - 40m or 100m. One pupil runs, one times, one records on data sheet. You can have 6/7 going at same time if you have that many stopwatches (the device not THE stopwatch!). Pupils will love trying to beat their time and be overall leader. Differentiation is sorted as all pupils can aim to beat their best, and you can follow up with a throwing event the following week for those who are not strong sprinters but might be good throwers.
    Endless possibilities for charts, tables, top 5, most improved, athlete of the week. Plus get in contact with local sports association in your area - must be some athletics comps coming up for the most able.
    I get some stick for my competitive views on here but KS2 pupils crave competition. Competition is competing against others but also competing against yourself and beating your best. Plenty of reward and praise for everyone.
     

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