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Please help me support a GTP student

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by caramel, May 9, 2012.

  1. Hi
    We are having a GTP student next year. Can you tell me their teaching commitment across the year and any tips on how to give them good quality support. If you are a GTP student what would you want me to do to support you?
     
  2. Hi
    We are having a GTP student next year. Can you tell me their teaching commitment across the year and any tips on how to give them good quality support. If you are a GTP student what would you want me to do to support you?
     
  3. 40 % 60% and 80% for me- current gtp er.
    I have really appreciated being treated like a member of staff, given freedom to experiment, time to discuss plans and lessons, honest feedback and a shoulder to cry on when I'm really stressed.
    I love that my mentor has willingly shared her class with me and as far as the kids know, we are equal.
    Don't hide anything away, let ur student have a real experience of teaching and all that goes with it. I have organised trips, done parents evenings, dealt with major behaviour incidents, assessed writing and been accountable at pupil progress.

    Ur student will get out as much as they put it and they must be willing to be self motivating.

    I have had a fab year and can't thank my mentor enough. She has made it for me!
     
  4. wkclark

    wkclark New commenter

    From my perspective as a current GTP -
    Feedback! Be constructive. The best feedback I get is not, "you didn't do this well at all...", it's "you did this ok, but it would probably be improved by doing x." Focus on what they can improve on - if they don't know how to do something, teach them. Don't Only tell them what they are doing wrong. There will be times when the GTP student will feel like they aren't doing anything well, at all, ever, and I've learned this year that people tend to respond well to praise (I try to use this much more with my students).
    Also, when doing lesson observations (even unofficial ones) it is always helpful to link it to the standards, in order to get good evidence. I know standards are changing, but it has been immensely helpful when the language is linked to standards... but that's just for evidence.
     
  5. The best feedback would be "you did this ok, how do <u>you</u> think you might have done that differently/better" - which often led into long discussions with my mentor. Frustrating at the time, but it has made me a MUCH better teacher. My mentor knew the answers, but spent hours teasing the answers out of me - making me work it out (sometimes with a lot of help, but I worked it out!)

    Not telling them what to do, but making suggestions - "you could try this" or "how about...." were also useful - as above, I think in the long run this has made me a much better teacher.
     
  6. Agree with Zimon. I developed as a reflective practitioner and still use this dialogue with myself now in this way :)
     
  7. Best thing my mentor did for me - disappear for a while during my first few weeks of teaching (actually she went sick for a week, but just popping out somewhere once or twice would do it!). I got to teach a few lessons without her in the room, which allowed me to try a few things, make a few mistakes and really helped me to establish myself in the classroom!
     

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