1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Planting seeds in an interview lesson?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by anon2145, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. As it says really - I am teaching a 30 minute Y1 lesson for an interview, and was thinking about seed-planting to tie in with springtime. I had the idea of discussing the parts of a plant - what does the root do etc and then the chn plant a sunflower seed. Then possibly writing about the steps taken with time connectives - i.e first we plant the seed, then we water it etc. I haven't decided whether it will be science or literacy yet so still vague but the thing that concerns me most is the planting and watering - is this too messy for an interview lesson? The school is big on using their outdoor space but am unsure whether going outside to do the planting is a good idea due to time constraints?
    I can just see water and soil going everywhere and me being pretty unpopular for making a mess in the classroom! It is a big class and unsure if I will have a TA. I would pre-fill the pots before the lesson with soil.
    Honest opinions welcome.
     
  2. As it says really - I am teaching a 30 minute Y1 lesson for an interview, and was thinking about seed-planting to tie in with springtime. I had the idea of discussing the parts of a plant - what does the root do etc and then the chn plant a sunflower seed. Then possibly writing about the steps taken with time connectives - i.e first we plant the seed, then we water it etc. I haven't decided whether it will be science or literacy yet so still vague but the thing that concerns me most is the planting and watering - is this too messy for an interview lesson? The school is big on using their outdoor space but am unsure whether going outside to do the planting is a good idea due to time constraints?
    I can just see water and soil going everywhere and me being pretty unpopular for making a mess in the classroom! It is a big class and unsure if I will have a TA. I would pre-fill the pots before the lesson with soil.
    Honest opinions welcome.
     
  3. gergil4

    gergil4 New commenter

    I wouldn't!!
    I like the general idea but I think actually planting the seeds is a small group activity with your own class. Can you use the outside area to draw a plant on the ground in chalk and discuss the parts? Children can e.g. run from the soil, up the stem and into the leaves to show where water is needed? Cards/pictures to sequence plant growth? Pictures of different plant parts - one each, get into groups (all the leaves) and discuss how they are the same/different?
    Good luck.
     
  4. harsh-but-fair

    harsh-but-fair Lead commenter

    Seconded
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    The main issue will be time. You'll never manage all that in 30 minutes with a Y1 class you've never met before.
    It would be a struggle with a Y6 class.
     
  6. I wouldn't consider this, either, and I love anything to do with plants! I've done it with yr 3/4, with TA support and it's still a bit of a nightmare, and not something I'd want to be observed with! Very difficult to keep a clear learning focus when there's so much practical stuff going on.
    Maybe a better idea to start from what you want the learning objective to be, rather than the activity?
     
  7. 2004ajd

    2004ajd New commenter

    I harvested and weighed potatoes once for an inspection lesson. (y4) It was a good lesson but hardly went as planned! I'd avoid this without knowing the children as the excitement may mean that classroom management is difficult :)
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Can you make it a whole class session where you scribe what the various parts of the plant are on a large picture. Then go and look to see what plants you can find outside. Then maybe plant a bean in a jar where they can watch what happens after you have gone.

    I like the idea and would love to see someone at interview being that creative and exciting.
     
  9. Having watched lots of interview lessons my advice is to start with the lo then work out activity. It is obvious when people teach an exciting activity focused lesson but aren't clear what they want the children to learn! This is not the sane as a well thought out lo with exciting activities !!!
     

Share This Page