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Pie Corbetts Storytelling from memory - How to do this with longer stories?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by impulce, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. We are trying to embed some pie corbett style storytelling into our curriculum. We're pretty good at story mappinge etc and storytelling with actions when it is a simple but memorable story.
    However, I am really struggling to get the storytelling into place with my Y2 class now we are starting to look at longer stories.
    Pie says not to move onto writing until children can tell you the whole story verbally - but how can we do this with longer, complex stories that dont follow the same rhythm/repetition of simpler tales?
    I am currently planning "Bob the man on the moon" and know they wont be able to re-tell the whole story without weeks and weeks rehearsing it which would surely get very dull!
    What do others do? Should I just orally rehearse a chosen section? Doesn't this defeat the point as they wont then have a 'blueprint' of the whole story in their head?
    Should I re-write it into a simpler script? (But then in the process we lose the 'good stuff' from the story itself and the creativity and vocabulary will be lost)
    Thankyou to anyone who can shed some light!
     
  2. We are trying to embed some pie corbett style storytelling into our curriculum. We're pretty good at story mappinge etc and storytelling with actions when it is a simple but memorable story.
    However, I am really struggling to get the storytelling into place with my Y2 class now we are starting to look at longer stories.
    Pie says not to move onto writing until children can tell you the whole story verbally - but how can we do this with longer, complex stories that dont follow the same rhythm/repetition of simpler tales?
    I am currently planning "Bob the man on the moon" and know they wont be able to re-tell the whole story without weeks and weeks rehearsing it which would surely get very dull!
    What do others do? Should I just orally rehearse a chosen section? Doesn't this defeat the point as they wont then have a 'blueprint' of the whole story in their head?
    Should I re-write it into a simpler script? (But then in the process we lose the 'good stuff' from the story itself and the creativity and vocabulary will be lost)
    Thankyou to anyone who can shed some light!
     
  3. sara2323

    sara2323 New commenter

    Also struggling with this but I would recommend asking Pie, he's on twitter and usually quite quick with replying to questions.
     
  4. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    The idea of Pie Corbett's "Stories for writing" is that you use the structure of a story as the basis for creating your own. If the children can't retell the story, they don't know the story structure well enough to use it as a starting point for their own writing.
    Presumably you're not going to ask your class to write their own stories that are as long and complex as the stories you're using? If so, they don't need to have every single event from the story in their heads. Perhaps you should focus on the key events of the story, putting them into your story map, but exploring those events in more depth during lessons so that you aren't missing out the 'good stuff'.
     
  5. Pie Corbett works with our school and he recommends the texts the childre learn are between 300 and 400 words. You then make them appropriate to the level by including appropriate language features. If there is a particular story you want to do which is much longer, write a précis of it, including the language features you wish to focus on.
     
  6. Thankyou for the replies. I actually found Pie on twitter, got a response, and wrote a "shorter" version of the story all before I read these replies - coincidental, but its nice to be reassured!
    I have rewritten it as a shorter script, including some of the good stuff but adapting to include connectives and a little bit of repitition. It didnt take me as long as I expected.
    I think what I struggle with is that I am in Y2 and have some very able and creative writers, so restricting them to a set repetative story structure would concern me with the lack of opportunity for creativity and detail. I suppose I just emphasise my expectation at the 'invent' stage and encourage them to include more detail and creativity during that part of the writing process.
    I wonder how this would be put into practice in a high ability Y6 class where children may be writing extended imaginative texts? Surely they cannot just learn a structure and adapt it at this level, as it would be so advanced? Thankfully Im not in Y6 so it is not a practical concern just yet!
     
  7. I'm in year 6 and the chn do still find this structure useful, however they do not need to learn it word for word so much. This is because they have already internalised many text patterns and so can use a text or story map to verbally retell a story without as much support.
     
  8. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    I have been wondering this. My class are year 5 and we are currently reading longer stories with chapters. How do you 'talk the text' for this? Just choose a key chapter or pick out the main points from the whole book?! You could go on forever if you did that and it would be difficult to put in the language. I haven't done it for the unit i'm currently on and it's a shame because it does work.
     
  9. Also in year 5 - have assumed that you talk as you want to write so we read novels etc to pick up language and ideas etc - and (whisper it quietly) just because we enjoy them - but the type of texts that I want them to write are the ones that we talk and map out etc. You wouldn't expect either that you would be able to learn Harry Potter off by heart but then neither would you expect your class to write a complex story like that in a literacy unit. We are currently doing Beowulf and I have found (my first narrative using Talk for Writing with year 5) that they are able to incorporate lots of the storytelling language in their own stories without being able to word for word recount my telling of Beowulf. However, when it comes to actually writing them instead of telling them, I will get more into character/setting description etc than I do in the storytelling.

    Funnily enough, I feel much more confident doing this strategy with non-fiction than fiction for the reasons outlined by others in upper KS2. I keep telling myself that the structure and the language are the key points so if they know the 'shape' of their story and have picked up genre-specific language from the storytelling then the rest of it is just good teaching of writing anyway.
     
  10. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    So how does that look in your class? Clearly you wouldn't map out and text talk a story such as Harry Potter, but noting language / techniques used is part of what you do anyway...But that isn't 'talking the text' as Pie suggests?
     

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