1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Physical Education Teacher - few questions

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by ineedahaircut, Jul 4, 2020.

  1. ineedahaircut

    ineedahaircut New commenter

    Hi,

    I'm interested in becoming a PE teacher having recently attaining a BSc (2:1).

    I was hoping that one of you would be kind to take a few minutes out of your hectic schedules and answer a few questions..?!

    1. Is there a high enough demand to even warrant entering this specific subject?
    2. I am in the process of interviewing for a salaried trainee PE apprenticeship role, how competitive are the interviews for NQT roles post-apprenticeship?
    3. Are the hours truly circa 50+ each week, when taking into account homework marking, etc? Or is this subject dependent?

    Thanks in advance - appreciate any responses!

    Jack
     
  2. diddydave

    diddydave Established commenter

    You might want to take a look through the subject specific forum for PE, there will be number of conversations there that may help you form your opinion: https://community.tes.com/forums/physical-education.34/

    For my part I taught Maths and IT but my wife was full-time PE and before retirement a Head of Department so I do have some comments to offer regarding secondary level teaching.

    1) Re the need:

    PE is a compulsory part of the curriculum so there will always need to have teachers for it, however many do double up with other subjects - my wife did 6th Form "General Studies" although her 2nd subject was officially history.

    If you can offer other subjects it widens your options as it gives schools more flexibility in how they can run a timetable.

    2) No idea on this but I do know that when we ran interview there were 4-5 times as many applicants for the PE jobs in her department than there were for Computer Science jobs in mine!

    3) Hours

    In the years before we offered GCSE and A level PE exams then she worked about the same number of hours as myself with after-school clubs being run in the time when I would be marking. After she started doing exam classes she would spend quite a few more hours than I did because she still ran the sports clubs in the lunch hours and after school (I did also run a couple of clubs but that was only 1 lunch hour and a single hour on one evening compared to her doing 5 lunches and 4 after school sessions).

    A typical week for me was 22-24 hours in the classroom teaching my subject, another 2 hours of registration and pastoral tutoring, 8 hours in the mornings before school setting up, 2 hours a week after school in meetings and then in the evenings I'd probably mark for another hour or two - so about 7 hours a week. The weekends probably contributed another few hours, 2 hours in the quiet times of the year up to 10 hours in the run up to the exam periods.

    So yes 50 hours is quite possible, especially when you throw in Parents' evenings of 3+ hours each - I certainly gave up golf when I found that I couldn't afford the 4 hours it took to play a round at the weekend.
     
    agathamorse and TheoGriff like this.
  3. lahluwalia

    lahluwalia New commenter

    PE is incredibly competitive and having just completed my teacher training, it is very hard to get a job. My training provider had seven of us training. Four of us have got jobs out of seven of us in our area. Three of us are teaching a second subject as well as PE in all our cases Science for our NQT year. I had seven interviews in total and got a job on the last one. I was lucky to get this one and will be teaching science as a second subject, which I now got to spend time increasing my subject knowledge. A second subject is really useful as you will have more to offer to a school. Gender can play into how likely you would be able to get a job. As there seems to be more roles available for females come up. My cohort had four males, three females. Only one of males has a job and all three of us females have a job.

    For most jobs it’s very competitive. You never known how many applicants. If you do get shortlisted you could be up against 3 to 6 others for the job. My last interview I was up against four others, two interviewed before me, two after.

    My NQT schedule will be quite a lot of hours. I will have three evenings a week, taken up with meetings and CPD for NQT and Science and at least one/two evenings on extra-curricular activities. I would say as NQT if only teaching straight PE. Expect department meeting each week, NQT meeting/CPD is each week and at least a couple of extra curricular per week either after school or lunchtime depending on the school.

    I will be teaching about 21 hours a week, as my schools runs a 25 hours of lessons a week. I will be putting in a lot of hours, due to planning,marking, extra-curricular, meetings, CPD and parents evenings. I will also be a form tutor and meet with my form once a day.

    The more that you can offer a school the better your chances. I got my job through experience, willingness to learn, offering something different sports wise. Be useful and sell yourself in an interview is my best suggestion.
     
  4. DYNAMO67

    DYNAMO67 Lead commenter

    I think Jack you have to do some serious consideration here.... you seem a bit Woolley on demand for, and reality of your subject and teaching? Have you got much school experience? Because if not, I don’t fancy your chances of landing a paid, training slot.

    none of the answers are good news for you.

    lot of PE teachers, few jobs. You really do have to be exceptional.

    Are you prepared to slog? Are you prepared to do temporary contract work? Are you prepared to commute to find a job? Even better, move?

    if the answer to any of the above is no- I’d say leave alone.

    If for example you have financial commitments, or can only work in a small area with no ability to move, PE teaching jobs will not be easy to come across.
     

Share This Page