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Photographing Children MADNESS

Discussion in 'Primary' started by adonai, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Our Year 6 pupils have just returned from a school trip to London. We are an international school from the Czech Republic.
    My pupils were having lunch on a lawn outside of a London museum and were facinated by the red uniform of Year 1 pupils from a British school (our pupils don't wear uniforms). They began to take photos of the children from a distance when a teacher from the British school approached them and said "OH NO! Don't take photos of them". Taken aback my pupils returned to eating lunch and later asked me why she had asked them to stop.
    I was trained as a teacher in the UK and so I am not really surprised by the extent of the prohibitions and the seemingly unreasonable policies or, at least, their strict implementation by overreacting teachers. But its memories of such that make me glad to work outside of the UK.
     
  2. Our Year 6 pupils have just returned from a school trip to London. We are an international school from the Czech Republic.
    My pupils were having lunch on a lawn outside of a London museum and were facinated by the red uniform of Year 1 pupils from a British school (our pupils don't wear uniforms). They began to take photos of the children from a distance when a teacher from the British school approached them and said "OH NO! Don't take photos of them". Taken aback my pupils returned to eating lunch and later asked me why she had asked them to stop.
    I was trained as a teacher in the UK and so I am not really surprised by the extent of the prohibitions and the seemingly unreasonable policies or, at least, their strict implementation by overreacting teachers. But its memories of such that make me glad to work outside of the UK.
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Errrr but a crowd of unknown older children taking photos of young children would of course be a problem. Just the sheer rudeness of them taking photos of people without their express permission would prompt me to ask the older ones to stop. It isn't necessarily unreasonable or an overreaction, simply a request that your pupils show better manners.

    I'm more stunned that you, as a teacher, allowed your children to show such utter rudeness and disregard for younger children than that the other teacher asked your pupils to stop.
     
  4. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    Of course, the reality is that the teacher had no right to stop anyone taking photographs of people in a public place.
    And the OP is quite right - it is a complete madness, since it is clearly the case that this teacher had no concern about courtesy, or manners; merely the fear that someone might tell them off for allowing photographs to be taken!
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Not sure we can possibly know the motivation for the teacher's actions. It wasn't me, but I'd have done the same thing.
     
  6. The motivation of my permission was in the spur of the moment, when a unit on persuasive writing (fors and againsts of uniforms) had just come to fruition, and your Year 6 pupils have become excited about school uniforms - and are 50 metres away from a crowd of sixty children wearing them, and have never seen them before.
    A scene was taken from a distance, and hardly personal close ups of small groups.
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    If the teacher didn't want her class photographed couldn't she have asked her class to turn their faces away rather than appearing rude and paranoid.
    We have a child who can't be photographed because it would endanger him if his whereabouts were identified
     
  8. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    I've stopped a man taking photos of my class on a school trip before and watched him as he deleted the ones he had took. These were quite close and not of a "crowd scene" but still he had no right to do so. It's protecting the children.
     
  9. WolfPaul

    WolfPaul New commenter

    Actually, not only did he have a right to do so, in fact you had no right to stop him.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    In fact you broke the law by deleting his photograph ...
    "There is no legal restriction on photography in public places, and there is no presumption of privacy for individuals in a public place.
     
  11. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    I didn't delete them, he did. The photos were close and the children were clearly identifiable. It may not break the law but it is unethical. He was quite happy to do so and understood my concerns.
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Can you imagine how you made him feel?
     
  13. I understand the ethical difference between close and personal photographs taken by an adult - and photographs of a crowd taken by facinated and curious school children. Once again, the teacher who stopped my pupils completely overreacted.
     
  14. Complete over-reaction from you Minnie.... makes me wonder what our system has come to when it produces such a lack of good will and courtesey on the the behalf of teachers as yourself. Where is your faith in the world? In older children? What on earth are they likely to do with their pictures? Don't YOU realise how weird the UK uniform system is to many others countries and schools who haven't gone down that route. Children at my own school point out how 'boring it is' - obligatory uniform and how they 'can't see their friends' from the distance...they are encouraged to be critical thinkers and to make their own decisions taking into account the many factors- education of differences and discrimination being paramount..
    surely taking a photograph in a public place of these quaint and incomprehensible local customs is a part of educationa as well as partly the purpose of school trips - on which many photos seem to be encouraged anyway. SO well done the OP for posting, well done for questioning the sycophantically slavish following of bureaucratically dogmatic guidelines which have taken away our power and repsonsibility to think for ourselves.
    More stunned about your over-reaction Minie than anything else.
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I agree

     
  16. s1oux

    s1oux New commenter

    The whole photos-of-children thing has got completely out of hand. A girl in my class isn't allowed photos to be taken of her presumably because of fears that they might somehow find their way into the hands of a paedophile. Its ridiculous - te girl acts in the west end for gods sake! How is that any different?
    oh, I just don't know where to start.
    Trying to explain to her why is the hardest thing... I just don't know why...
     

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