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phonics

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by mancminx, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. mancminx

    mancminx New commenter

    I teach reception. but ive messed up with my phonic planning. we are currently working in phase 3. where are other teachers at with their class. Ive got lots of planning (from here-thank you fellow tessers) but everything is just a mess. my phonic folder holds planning back to Nov when i must have initailly started phase 3 but thats about it.
    Disorganised comes to mind. Id just feel better if i knew where other teachers were at at this moment.
    Thanks
     
  2. mancminx

    mancminx New commenter

    I teach reception. but ive messed up with my phonic planning. we are currently working in phase 3. where are other teachers at with their class. Ive got lots of planning (from here-thank you fellow tessers) but everything is just a mess. my phonic folder holds planning back to Nov when i must have initailly started phase 3 but thats about it.
    Disorganised comes to mind. Id just feel better if i knew where other teachers were at at this moment.
    Thanks
     
  3. In short, you should be up to where your class are! Working through phase 3, does sound typical with some children being on phase 2 or 1 and some higher, by now it is often common to have to split into groups as staffing allows.
    why not read
    Reading by six: how the best schools do - you will find it on the ofsted site.
    this will give you more information about best practice approches to teaching phonics.
     
  4. you need to assess what phases your individual children are secure at and work from there. If you are just teaching in one large group then go with the majority and differentiate up or down within the lesson for the others. Make sure you plan phonics activities into your continuous provision too.
     
  5. I've been told that I have to teach all 30 children together despite some of them being on Phase 2 and some secure on Phase 3 (September intake). I have been told that grouping the children is a no-no. I think we need a middle group to allow the children to receive the support they need. I wish the expert actually knew my children and their levels!
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Ignore the phases! review all sounds taught so far and progress don't wait for children to know all phase 2 before you start phase 3 and teach phase 4 alongside there is no reason why you should delay teaching cvcc/ccvc words until all sounds have been taught!
     
  7. Yes - the Phases were never intended to be a method of differentiation - simply steps for introducting the letter/s-sound correspondences of the alphabetic code.
    There are three core skills to be taught as part of the phonics teaching and some sub-skills as well.
    It is possible to introduce letter/s-sound correspondences in a steady pace for all the children and to provide plenty of skills practice for the three core skills.
    Know that the children will access the activities at their own level. Give them all words of different lengths and structures right from the start - don't keep the slower ones stuck at CVC level as that can become self-perpetuating.
    Allow the quicker children to complete activities at their own pace and then provide them extension activities.
    But keep introducing the alphabetic code consistently across the class.
    The slower-to-learn children may need more support (but don't do everything for them, teach and remind as you need, but insist that they apply themselves) - and they may need more time and opportunities to embed the learning of the code and to practise the skills.
     
  8. Yep doing all that Debbie and Msz. Conefident with letters and sounds. Where do high frequency words/sight words fit intio this re sending reading books home? And should home readers be mostly phonics based or a mix?
     
  9. Plz forgive typos!!
     
  10. Ideally - for beginners and strugglers you need cumulative, decodable reading books if you are going to send them home and ask children 'to read' the books.
    But, you also need to advise parents on how best to support their children with reading the books.
    If the supporting adult knew how to support their child and avoid the 'guessing words' from picture, context and initial letter cue, actually parents and children can 'share' the book.
    The parent/adult can model any sounding out and blending that is a bit challenging, or say, "In that word, those letters are code for the sound /.../ " and then the child can attempt the blending process.
    Or, that adult can simply tell the child the tricky word rather than tell the child to guess the word.
    Children do not need to be deprived of any 'type' of book as long as they are supported in a way that does not make the child guess the words and struggle.
     
  11. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    That would be such helpful advice for many parents. I do so wish you could e-mail all the parents at our school with your advice rather than the nonsense we are sent (including a maximum of one inappropriate book per week)
     
  12. http://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/Question/Index/3

    Lots of free e-books on this site too.
    One way of using the e-books if they match the children's reading level is for the child to read the books aloud to a supporting adult, and THEN listen to the recorded words!
     

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