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Phonics questionnaire

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by giraffe77, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. Has anyone possibly got a phonics questionnaire for teachers that I could look at? I have fairly recently got a new post, where I have also taken on the role of Literacy Co-ordinator, and I'd like to find out about frequency of phonics lessons (e.g. how many sounds taught per week), methods of teaching phonics, etc, as I'd like to work out a plan of where to go from here.
    NB I'm looking at phonics to begin with, as it was picked up as a weakness by Ofsted in the not-too-distant past.
    Thanks
     
  2. Has anyone possibly got a phonics questionnaire for teachers that I could look at? I have fairly recently got a new post, where I have also taken on the role of Literacy Co-ordinator, and I'd like to find out about frequency of phonics lessons (e.g. how many sounds taught per week), methods of teaching phonics, etc, as I'd like to work out a plan of where to go from here.
    NB I'm looking at phonics to begin with, as it was picked up as a weakness by Ofsted in the not-too-distant past.
    Thanks
     
  3. Haven't got a questionnaire but have just started teaching Read, Write Inc. in all its glory (!) The phonics sessions are really great and seem to be working.
    We teach a new sound each day, consolidating previous ones and re-visiting for those that the children got stuck on or the initial input didn't hammer home! Todday I covered o-e: "oh, phone home" in a multitude of silly voices and then had very BA chn (aged 7) spelling spoke/joke etc, etc - very encouraging.
    I would recommend anything by Ruth Miskin, but especially picking and chosing the bits that work for you and yours. Good luck finding the right scheme.
     
  4. I've used RWI in a school before, and that's the way I'd like to go in some ways, but I'd like it to come from evidence from a questionnaire, or somthing similar. I'd like to do lesson observations as well, but I need to know that the teachers don't know I'm focussing on phonics in some way, otherwise they'll all do marvellous one-off phonic lesson, but it won't be a true indication of what normally happens.
    Thanks though.
    Just realised I left my email off - hollyv71@hotmail.co.uk (please indicate on here if you send me anything - it's an adress I don't use very often
     
  5. But surely you should also be able to have discussions with the teachers about their phonics provision and wider literacy and how these link.
    In training events that I provide, I ask for an indication across all the attending schools as to how much phonics they provide daily, for example.
    The difference is staggering. It ranges from 10 minutes a day in reality (although 20 minutes a day according to the paper plan) to one hour a day.
    This means that children may, for example, get 50 minutes a week compared to five hours per week.
    Of course, this is very simplistic in that it does not quantify any additional phonics activities or phonics application to wider reading, spelling and writing - but in simple terms it does show that there could be significant differences in provision from one school to the next.
    So, not only can schools choose not to teach synthetic phonics, they can also choose not to do very much - or to do a great deal.
    Quite a lottery, still, for the children themselves then.[​IMG]
     
  6. The consistency is a bit of a worry in my new school, so I'll be doing all kinds of auditing (lesson obs included). Still can't find a questionnaire, so I'm going to try and make up my own, does anyone know where I can find a phonics audit?
     
  7. I would have thought an audit of resources in each class, a look at planning and lesson observations would suffice (in addition to talking to your colleagues).
     
  8. Some dedicated staff meetings, perhaps, so all teachers and assistants can benefit from discovering more about practice amongst colleagues?
     

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