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phonics intervention in reception - help!!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by hsz06rgu, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. hsz06rgu

    hsz06rgu New commenter

    Hi, I have a group of my reception children who have grasped all of the phase 2 letter sounds but as of yet are not using them to support their writing. They are using them a little better in reading, but still not as I would like.
    I'm starting an 'intervention group' with them this term, but I'm unsure to how many sessions a week they should have? I'm following my LA's advice and including them in the whole class phonics programme, so this would be in addition to the whole class work. My gut instinct is to do it daily, however these children are also receiving additional reading support as well as name writing support, I feel that this is too adult directed, especially as they are the children who could really benefit from more child initiated activities!
    Is three times a week appropriate? That way they are getting additional support each day when I also include name writing and reading support, but it's not taking too much time away from their CIA time. Any advice is gratefully taken.
    Thanks,
    Hsz06rgu x
     
  2. hsz06rgu

    hsz06rgu New commenter

    Hi, I have a group of my reception children who have grasped all of the phase 2 letter sounds but as of yet are not using them to support their writing. They are using them a little better in reading, but still not as I would like.
    I'm starting an 'intervention group' with them this term, but I'm unsure to how many sessions a week they should have? I'm following my LA's advice and including them in the whole class phonics programme, so this would be in addition to the whole class work. My gut instinct is to do it daily, however these children are also receiving additional reading support as well as name writing support, I feel that this is too adult directed, especially as they are the children who could really benefit from more child initiated activities!
    Is three times a week appropriate? That way they are getting additional support each day when I also include name writing and reading support, but it's not taking too much time away from their CIA time. Any advice is gratefully taken.
    Thanks,
    Hsz06rgu x
     
  3. Hi
    I nearly didn't reply but this post made me sad. I think it's fab that you want to help them but how sad that this system implies that these very young (4 year old?) children are already deemed to be 'behind'. I presume they have only been in school for 1 term? I have a group who are similar but don't do 'intervention' but give some additional adult support during our whole class phase 3 phonics and as much adult help whilst they are playing as we can. I agree that too much adult directed input can be overwhelming but there are many ways to help these children whilst engaging in their play. Perhaps you could consider that?
    Some of the more spontaneous ways we are helping are by doing lots of mark making outside with chalk and wet mud on pieces of cardboard, adding letters to the bikes and playing games with those, doing letter hunts, writing names in the air and letting the wind blow them away etc. Whilst I know these may not be perceived as intervention, the children are not aware that they are doing anything but playing and IT IS WORKING.
    It may be that these children aren't behind but younger or later developers - despite what our assessment system implies, not all children need to be at the same stage at the same time to be progressing. I think you should stick with your instincts that are telling you this already. Anyway whatever you decide I hope it works!
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    That's exactly why I didn't reply when I first read this. They don't need an intervention just more practise and time. Keep teaching them as part of the class with daily revisits to previously taught sounds.
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I agree. I think also that now is the time to do all you can to make a systematic effort with handwriting skills and all the skills that are needed in order to develop them.
     
  6. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I agree too. They are ever so young and may not be ready.
     
  7. hsz06rgu

    hsz06rgu New commenter

    Hi, thanks for your replies.
    It's good to know that my instincts are correct, although it may not have sounded like it from my previous post. My gut instinct is to leave it completely and let them learn as they are ready, but as literacy coordinator I am also in charge of showing progress in phonics. Although these children are making small steps by learning the letter sounds, they are getting really left behind with implementing it. I already have stage 7 (ORT) readers and I don't want these children to notice and to feel as though they can't do what others do.
    What I am pleased about is the suggested activities you gave, as they are virtually all in my 'intervention' plan already. I know that phonics, reading and writing is not all about letters on the page and I want to engage them as much as possible, hence there are lots of sand and water activities, drawing in chalk, in the air and on large pieces of paper etc. It's more about getting them used to the idea of thinking about the sounds and making them interested in them as opposed to writing conventional words. I'm hoping this is enough to get them going as now we are on phase 3 I think they run the risk of becoming disengaged when the going gets tough for them which it inevitably will unless I do something for them now. Fingers crossed this will help!
    Thanks again for your ideas,
    hsz06rgu
     
  8. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Sorry, but what is wrong with getting FS2 children writing with pencil and paper?
     
  9. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    What about using pencils on normal-sized pieces of paper, with a HUGE emphasis on letter formation?
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The key word ...these aren't replacing normal teaching activities they are additional incidental teaching!
    Our reception children write on lined paper with normal pencils
     
  11. Thanks for clarifying that Msz. All our reception children regularly write on lined paper with a pencil working with adults who support correct pencil grip and letter formation. The activities mentioned are additional to these activities to help them feel confident whilst writing in a fun, child-led way. Teaching correct grip and formation does need formal teaching by an adult but much of the practise and consolidation does not and can successfully be done through play.
     

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