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Phonetic reading books

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by helenfw, Nov 20, 2007.

  1. Just been given some money for phonetic reading books (Yr R). We currently use Ginn 360 which are useless for decoding!

    I dont really know where to start...

    We use letters and sounds with a bit of JP to learn letter sounds.

    Does anybody know any good phonetic books? Would need to get quite a few as we have none at the moment so need to be fairly cheep - but want good quality that the children will enjoy.

    Also do your children stay on the scheme through yr 1 and 2 as we currently also use Ginn360 in yr 1 and 2?

    Thanks
     
  2. Just been given some money for phonetic reading books (Yr R). We currently use Ginn 360 which are useless for decoding!

    I dont really know where to start...

    We use letters and sounds with a bit of JP to learn letter sounds.

    Does anybody know any good phonetic books? Would need to get quite a few as we have none at the moment so need to be fairly cheep - but want good quality that the children will enjoy.

    Also do your children stay on the scheme through yr 1 and 2 as we currently also use Ginn360 in yr 1 and 2?

    Thanks
     
  3. Songbirds are lovely books, but there aren't enough at the lower stages.
    We haven't got them, but I've seen 'dandelion books' and they look good.
    www.phonicbooks.co.uk

    If you are looking to get children reading quickly, then decodable sheets of text can be very successful. The joy of this is that you can complete them very quickly and it is easy to have children read these at least three times a week, if not every day. Plus, they can then be sent home to be read again.

    Last year, I used decodable text 3 / 4 times a week and then once a week a guided reading book that was within their phonic knowldege.

    The ditties from Read Write Inc are great to start with and then I used the Jelly and Bean photocopiable text. Jelly and Bean also come as books and provide a very comprehensive phonic reading scheme.
     
  4. Thanks.

    I am ideally looking for books to be sent home as home readers so would prefer books to sheets.

    I had a look at the dandylion ones but there didnt seem to be many simple i.e. CVC word ones. They seemed to get harder quite quickly and I would like quite a few simple ones.

    What are Jelly and Bean like? Is there a lot for each stage.

    I have also just looked at Get reading right, but cant seem to find aywhere to order them? Has anyone used these?

     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Sorry for being picky but you don't want phonetic reading books (phonetics is the study of speech)you want phonic reading books. Rigby Star are advertised as 100% aligned to Letters and Sounds. We use Rigby Star, Big Cat Phonics and Songbirds all very good.
     
  6. Oh its so hard!! I hate decisions!!

    Wish I'd never asked for some now!
     
  7. Right after a few hours of research I like the look of Jelly and Bean! There seema to be quite a few of these and they seem to start of fairly simple.

    What are peoples views on this scheme?
     
  8. I've just received inspection copies from kingscourt/ McGraw-hill of their phonic readers. There are about 50 of them, and seem very good. the only slight drawback is that they are american, so in a few books talk about gas/petrol and mad/angry. There aren't that many americanisms in total and they would be easily explained. Don't know the cost.
     
  9. Has anyone used the Read-Write Ditty books by Oxford(can't seem to find out what they look like) or the Get Reading Right 'Letters and Sounds' series? The latter sounds good, but haven't seen them in the flesh as yet and want to try books related to Letters and Sounds taught so far as seems to be working very well!! Can anyone help? Thank you xx
     
  10. Helen

    We got Jelly and Bean last year. The children really like them.

    Bev
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  12. @SuzieAnn
    The Read Write Inc ditty books aren't reading books to send home, as such. They do Ditty Photocopy masters, which are 1 page decodable things for them to read. The ditty books are consumables (so each child must have their own) and they teach reading and writing. They're to be used before moving onto the books.
     
  13. Helen - I was given £200 by my head for a new reading scheme. I put my order in for jelly and Bean today as I like the look of them, and I was able to buy a good selection of phase 2-5 books for that amount. They look appealing and I am sure my children are going to enjoy them.
     
  14. I've used the dandelion readers from www.phonicbooks.co.uk

    The pictures are great and the kids like the cast of characters. They are also funny stories.

    The scheme does not progress too quickly (see post above) as it starts from a very simple level. The first 3 books are based on five sounds. The second 3 books are based on those + 3 more and so on. There are 50 books building up to two syllable words. The structure builds up very slowly So you can start from very early in a childs exposure to letters. The books use very few tricky words. They are excellent to give children lots of decoding practice as they are inventive with the words that they use.

    Very good for reception level kids. Even better for reluctant readers.

    They are also well priced.
     
  15. jojoincharge

    jojoincharge New commenter

    the new phonically decodable books from Rigby Star are great. They are linked directly to the phases and sets of letters.On the back of each book, at a glance, you can see what sounds and tricky words are focused on in the book. but the best thing is, they are good qulality books - the non fiction have excellent qulaity photos in them and they certainly are not stilted or boring. They would also be good for some strugglers at KS2 owing to the high interest factor
     
  16. We also use Dandelion readers and are very pleased with them for all the reasons already given.
     
  17. Oxford reading tree have produced a set, written by the brilliant Julia Donaldson, but I haven't actually seen them.
    I'd really recommend Rigby Star who do specific simple cvc ones plus great repetitive early readers that are colour coded to match the 'Book Bands'produced by the Instiute of education, London
     
  18. I LOVE Jelly and Bean and the children do too but there are a couple of points to consider. They don't follow the order of Letters and Sounds (not insuperable of course) and, because they are about farm animals, they are not widely culturally relevant, so you might want to supplement them with something more so.

    We found that we needed to buy from several series in order to have enough books to sustain some children for long enough.

    We have bought some Songbirds which the children seem to like. Also Dandelion. I understand that more are in the pipeline at the later stages (digraphs?) which will stand alone and so complement Letters and Sounds. Dandelion follow the Sounds-write programme, which produces its own books.

    We decided against the Ditty books as they are consumables and, as Disco Stu says, teach reading and writing and so are not conventional readers.

    I haven't seen the Rigby books.

    Books which match Book Bands and are predictable and repetitive in the early stages are likely NOT to be decodable. This would cause confusion for your children every time they are faced with a new book. Do they decode or do they guess? Guessing should NEVER be the strategy to adopt.
     

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