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Pheasant ideas

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by RJR_38, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    I went to visit my friend for lunch today and she lives in quite a 'countryfied' town. On the way back through I stopped off at the local market and there was a stall selling all sorts of game including pheasant. I have eaten it in restaurants before and really liked it so thought I would get a couple (one to eat and one for the freezer). However, they were £4 each or 4 for £10 so being the bargain hunter I am it seemed really silly to only buy 2 lol!
    Obviously they will go into the freezer to use over the next couple of months but other than roasting the whole thing how else could I cook it? Has anyone got any good recipes?
    Also, can I cook it slightly rare (which is how I like most meat) or do I need to check it is properly cooked all the way through like chicken/pork?
    Finally - is it worth making stock from all the carcasses like I would do with chicken?
     
  2. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    I went to visit my friend for lunch today and she lives in quite a 'countryfied' town. On the way back through I stopped off at the local market and there was a stall selling all sorts of game including pheasant. I have eaten it in restaurants before and really liked it so thought I would get a couple (one to eat and one for the freezer). However, they were £4 each or 4 for £10 so being the bargain hunter I am it seemed really silly to only buy 2 lol!
    Obviously they will go into the freezer to use over the next couple of months but other than roasting the whole thing how else could I cook it? Has anyone got any good recipes?
    Also, can I cook it slightly rare (which is how I like most meat) or do I need to check it is properly cooked all the way through like chicken/pork?
    Finally - is it worth making stock from all the carcasses like I would do with chicken?
     
  3. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    When I did my CB course, we learnt Faisan Vallée D'Auge, gorgeous, pheasant, jointed and casseroled in white wine with apple and celery then the sauce blended and thickened with cream. I'll look for the recipe and post it.
     
  4. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    It can be served slightly rare, and sometimes benefits from being a little pink given its tendency to dryness.
    A good way to cook it, avoiding such dryness is to braise it. I like to brown chunks of fatty bacon in a little butter until the fat is released in a casserole and then remove brown the seasoned pheasant all over (one is usually enough for two), remove and then add whole cloves of garlic and cook until slightly golden, then deglaze with white wine and then add fresh thyme, chicken stock (about a pint) and then put the pheasant back in and seal tightly (with a cartouche if your lid doesn't seal tightly) and cook on a low oven for an hour or so, and allow to rest well. I see no reason not to add other veg to the pan to make a pot-roast, all-in-one meal...
    Obviously, with this method, the flavour of the bones goes into your sauce, so no stock, but you can make a stock from the carcass if you roast it, but you might want to keep it and freeze it until you have 2 or 3, otherwise it's probably not worth it.
     
  5. as the shooting season is nearly over, any birds shot now are likely to older and therefore tougher. I love roast pheasant but would opt to braise them. Very similar to the above posts but I quite like to deglaze the pan with a small glass of cognac! Makes lovely rich sauce.
     
  6. I like to braise pheasant in cider.
    I blob bits of butter on to the pheasant then cover with some strips of bacon. Pop into a fairly hot oven and roast for about half an hour.
    Then turn down the heat to about 160, pour on the cider, bung in a few shallots, cover with a lid or foil and then braise for about an hour.
    Right towards the end, I drain off the cider, bring it up to bubble in a pan and reduce slightly, then thicken with a spoonful of flour (or bind with butter) and stir in some creme fraiche.
    Serve with veg and mounds of mashed potato.
    Or if that doesn't take your fancy, have a look here [​IMG]
    http://www.basc.org.uk/en/games-on/topnav/recipes/pheasant-recipes/index.cfm
     
  7. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    Thanks for all the ideas! I thought it would probably be prone to dryness (like rabbit) so I shall bear that in mind.
    I like the sound of all these recipes and will undoubtedly try most of them over the next few months. WIll probably try CQs first I think - purely because I love food cooked in cider. One question - would you joint the pheasant and cook the joints or cook the whole thing and then carve off the meat etc?
    I will also check out that site CQ - I have already been googling away but not come across that site yet.
     
  8. I tend to joint mine if braising. I leave it whole if roasting.
     
  9. Oh and I have hotlisted this to try the other recipes as well [​IMG]
     
  10. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    There are loads of good sounding recipes on that site! And lapin your descriptionsounds gorgeous so recipe would be much appreciated!!
     
  11. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    What a coincidence - I very nearly (but didn't) bought pheasant at our game butcher in town (£3 each): I didn't because I was buying for a dinner next week and the guests gave us pheasant last time we were there: I got smoked gammon hocks instead - what shall I do with them??????????
     
  12. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    How did they cook the pheasant at their dinner party? As a guest did you like it?
     
  13. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    pan-fried breasts served with a gravy/jus made from braising the legs with lardons and garlic in white wine.

     
  14. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I leave them whole when braising. The breasts benefit from being cooked on the bone - much less chance of drying out. The stock also benefits from all the flavour from the rest of the carcass,
    I don't so much carve as cut the legs off and cut the entire breasts off the ribcage, and cut these into thick slices to serve.
     
  15. Do you joint differently to me? When I joint, the bones are still on...?
    Or what do you mean?
    I only remove bones of anything AFTER cooking.
     
  16. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    With the legs, yes the bones remain in generally, unless I want boned legs to stuff, or to cut up for s stir fry, but I'd tend to joint breasts so that they're removed from the ribcage, with just the wing tips attached, like a chicken supreme, but I wouldn't do this for braising anyway - probably for stuffing or grilling.
    I understand what you're saying about leaving the ribs attached, but I'd tend to keep the whole thing in one piece if I was doing that, and remove it from the ribs before serving. I find that serving the breast with the ribs still attached can be a little messy. Neither of us is wrong, CQ, just different ways of doing it
     
  17. Tee hee! No, I wasn't suggesting you were wrong, I was just trying to visualise how you bone [​IMG]
    I also remove breast meat from the ribs before serving.
    Btw. - I think it was you who mentioned it - it is DEFINITELY worth freezing the carcasses/bones/scrappy bits of skin, etc. until you have enough to make a big pot of stock!

     
  18. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    Interesting discussion re: jointing as I have always jointed a chicken by removing the breasts from the rib cage and then cooking - I have been self-taught from some cheesy american you tube videos though lol. I am definitely going to try jointing the pheasants by leaving the rib cage on as I can completely see what you mean about that helping to keep the moisture and flavour.
    And as I have 4 birds I will be saving all the scraps to make some interesting and flavourful stock!
     
  19. My tip - keep the wing tips as well for making stock xx
     
  20. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    Will do! I always keep every scrap for chicken stock so intend to do the same for this :)
     

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