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Phase Leader - KS1 or KS2?

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by Hope28, May 5, 2018.

  1. Hope28

    Hope28 New commenter

    Eventually I'd like to go into school leadership because I love helping teachers develop their practice. For career progression in primary, do you think it matters whether you've been KS1 phase leader or KS2 phase leader? Or do you need to have been a phase leader at all if you've led a core subject?
     
  2. drvs

    drvs Star commenter

    Contentious comment coming ... in my experience KS2 teachers and leaders make better through primary leaders than their KS1 counterparts.
     
    BetterNow likes this.
  3. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    Personally, I think it is crucial to have teaching experience across the whole primary age-range. This gives you the necessary experience and credibility. Also important is to have some middle-leadership role (this could be a phase leader or similar) and a role which has a whole school focus such as a core subject leader, SENDCo or similar.

    I find it really interesting the type of people/teachers end up teaching Year 6, just take a look around at several local schools. That said, I don't think it really matters which phase as the skills and experiences you will be developing are exactly the same.
     
    drvs likes this.
  4. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    I've not met too many SLTs who have the time to do this. (And actually have met a fair few who think they do this and actually just arrogantly impose their will on others, not enabling teachers to develop at all.)
    If this is what you want then go into teacher training or similar.
     
    Orchid2457 likes this.
  5. Hope28

    Hope28 New commenter

    Teacher training is my longer term aim but I'd like to stay teaching myself for a few more years. I have experience of both key stages (including year 6) and currently have the opportunity to decide which phase to lead. I feel like I'd learn more in ks1 as we're investigated more child-led learning there, but ks2 would allow me the experience of leading a greater range of staff (and my experience of leaders is similar to drvs). Hmm. Still no answer! Any more points I should consider?
     
  6. drvs

    drvs Star commenter

    Are you the school's ITT / NQT lead? Does the school have a preference as to which KS it puts its trainees / NQTs?
     
  7. Hope28

    Hope28 New commenter

    NQTs happen to be in ks2 for this Sept but it's not always that way. NQT mentor is always the DH, there doesn't seem to be any leeway on that. We don't take trainee teachers die to the nature of the school catchment. I don't plan to stay at this school forever, just up to 2 years as a phase leader and then move on (& up?) elsewhere. It's sounding like ks2 would be preferable career-wise but there's the added complication of trying to get pregnant and stress has already impacted that significantly ☹. Your questions really help though so keep them coming!
     
  8. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Progression to and from what? If you mean from a regular Class Teacher role to a senior leadership role (AHT/DHT/HT), then yes it would be helpful if you had led a KS/Phase previously. KS2 is obviously a bigger job than KS1, as will involve looking after more pupils and staff, plus being (to some degree) accountable for SATs outcomes (which go a very long way to determining the perception of how successful the school is...)
     
  9. cornflake

    cornflake Senior commenter

    Not all schools have phase leaders - we don't (aside from a named EYFS person) as we are not big enough!
    Subject leads go right through our primary
     
    Pomza likes this.
  10. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    So you aren't getting pregnant as easily as you hoped, with stress a significant factor.
    And then you are going to take on more work and stress, while still wanting to get pregnant?

    How long have you been teaching? How old are you? Just trying to work out how urgent it is for you to need to move on up. If you are under 35ish, I would suggest you relax and stay as classteacher, putting all your energies into getting pregnant. Have your children and enjoy them as babies, then start the move onwards and upwards careerwise later.

    I don't mean you can't be a mum and have promotions, of course you can, but there is no rush to get to the top. You probably have another 20-30 years at least of working life left to you. If you want to get pregnant and workplace stress is hampering it, then do what you can to alleviate the stress.
     
  11. Hope28

    Hope28 New commenter

    Many thanks for all the replies - a lot of food for thought. So much wisdom, no wonder you're all involved in education. I've still not made a decision but perhaps that's a decision in itself as what will be will be.
     
  12. pancake99

    pancake99 New commenter

    “ I love helping teachers develop their practice “
    Sorry but this sounds like you like being looked up to a little bit. I don’t know of any kind of leadership role in primary where you would find you were able to fulfill your desire to help teachers. All teachers primarily teach and on occasions we may guide others to do the same. This is more likely to be students and not other teachers as you put it. Also you need to make sure your own practice is worthy and this will come with experience in different key stages and different schools. There are too many people “helping” other teachers with their wisdom ( a few blog sites come to mind) and some of the advice is embarrassing to our profession. Get as much experience as you can first.
     
  13. Hope28

    Hope28 New commenter

    Thanks for your comments pancake99. Perhaps I wasn't as clear as I meant to be. The point of my question was to ask which leadership position do people think would best to enable me to eventually help more teachers develop their practice. I currently do this within English and have previously done similar roles for other subject areas - as has been common practice in all the schools I've worked in. I certainly wouldn't want to be working in a school where teachers weren't encouraged to develop each other. I don't think it's necessary to be a perfect teacher in order to do this, more that demonstrating a constant desire to learn and improve is what's needed. I completely agree that many blogs are spreading ill-researched 'wisdom' but please don't sweep me into a category without knowing more about me. I intend to get as much experience as I can, that was the aim of the question.
     
    Pomza likes this.
  14. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Subject leads, in a good primary school, play a role in developing T&L. This could well involve supporting other teachers, where agreed and appropriate.

    The caveat being, that in order to have ANY credibility, your own practice needs to be beyond reproach.

    Phase/KS lead role is more of an admin thing. Rotas, cover etc.

    Often though, KS leads also subject leads...
     
  15. pancake99

    pancake99 New commenter

    I agree with Pomza. I’m sorry Hope but you do sound inexperienced or perhaps a little misguided. You seem focused on being a leader because you say perhaps ks2 is preferable to lead “a greater range of staff”. As a leader myself, leading is not what we do. We set good examples, maintain professionalism and offer a kind ear when needed or a shoulder to cry on. I don’t see why you feel the need to put Year 6 into brackets as if it has a greater meaning. Many Year 6 teachers are there because no one else will put up with the politics of SATS. You sound more like someone who may want to lead a school in the future. And for that, experience in both key stages is a huge advantage. I’m a middle leader and I “ lead” and help teachers when I can but mostly we are all working hard and there is no leading to be done. Just being a role model is what’s needed.
     
  16. drvs

    drvs Star commenter

    Caution, don't rush. I've worked with several young heads (they never lasted long) who bounced from "experience" to "experience" to plump their CVs and bolster their interview appeal for the next promotion. Beneath the surface they were all just thinly glittered turds with very little in the way of useful skill, philosophy or integrity. Sadly, there is such a shortage of heads down here that they keep getting jobs - this is the real crisis IMO.
     
    simonCOAL likes this.

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