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Phase 4/5 Letters and Sounds planning

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by choralsongster, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. choralsongster

    choralsongster New commenter

    I have split my Reception class into two separate phonics groups - one that has repeated Phase 2 and now onto Phase 3 with the children who were finding digraphs etc too difficult. They have made great progress; and my other group continued with Phase 3, recapping it again before now moving onto Phase 4.
    My problem is that I have a couple of children that are working comfortably at Phase 5, and instinctly can read even some of the split digraphs without having been taught them. I need to ensure that my Phase 4 teaching is extending and challenging the learning for my Phase 5ers. I work at a small school, where there are mixed year groups, so they couldn't have Phonics with KS1, as it wouldn't work with our timetable.
    Has anyone experienced this situation before, and how did you get around the planning?
     
  2. I haven't experienced this particular problem before but given the nature of a reception class I would have thought it possible to deliver your phase 4 teaching to the majority while your G&Ts are doing some other worthwhile acitivity perhaps some writing and then teach them phase 5 while the rest are acessing other acitivities. You could also use your TA once or twice a week to deliver the phase 5 teaching.
    Hope this helps.
    Jo
     
  3. Are you using an Alphabetic Code Chart to support your incidental phonics teaching?
    You can download your preferred version in the free resources section at www.phonicsinternational.com .
    Some children are perfectly capable of self-teaching - but you can also teach any part of the alphabetic code when required 'incidentally' - and the chart will support the principle of spelling alternatives for writing too.
     
  4. choralsongster

    choralsongster New commenter

    Thank you Debbie - yes, I have your large alphabetic code next to my teaching board - the children also use it independently in addition to incidental teaching during phonics/adult led sessions.
     

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