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PGCE refusal reasons

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by SELavr, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. Hi, Just to explain, I now teach ELT overseas, so am out of the loop with regard to the UK system now, but am a member of TES to TRY and keep up-to-date. My daughter has been applying for PGCEs this winter and has had a refusal which states her 'lack of diversity in education' as a reason. I am missing something here? Surely you cannot punish/refuse someone because of decisions their parents made regarding their education, or have we misunderstood something, or is this just a woolly statement? Any constructive comments gratefully received!
     
  2. Hi, Just to explain, I now teach ELT overseas, so am out of the loop with regard to the UK system now, but am a member of TES to TRY and keep up-to-date. My daughter has been applying for PGCEs this winter and has had a refusal which states her 'lack of diversity in education' as a reason. I am missing something here? Surely you cannot punish/refuse someone because of decisions their parents made regarding their education, or have we misunderstood something, or is this just a woolly statement? Any constructive comments gratefully received!
     
  3. What qualifications does she have?

    My suggestion would be to contact the university/provider which she received this refusal from for clarification. Only they can really know what they mean by "lack of diversity in education".
     
  4. Maybe it means lack of diversity in terms of your daughter's work experience? Different types of schools/ages groups/classes?
    Or maybe the subjects of her qualifications perhaps?
    The best thing to do is to contact the Universities concerned direct to ask for more detailed feedback. Better than trying to guess what they mean.
     
  5. It could be that, plus, judging by what the OP says, she may have been educated privately with no or little experience of state education. You can partly remedy that by getting plenty of work experience and volunteering in the maintained sector.
     
  6. I would add it should be her who seeks a clarification from the uni, not you. It doesn't give a good impression if she wants to take on the big responsibility of teaching but her mum's doing such things for her [​IMG] Good luck to her.
     
  7. Hmm! I wouldn't dream of contacting the Uni directly.
    And that request for info has already happened, which is how she knows.
    Interesting though, does 'not enough educational diversity' work both ways? Whether you are state educated or not?
     
  8. It seems to me it is just a way of saying she has little direct experience, be it as a student or a teacher, of state maintained schools in the UK. The provider is obviously worried that without this she would not have a realistic idea of what state schools are like.
    She will be in competition with candidates with a state education and in many cases months to years of experience as a teaching assistant in state maintained schools. All of these candidates I am sure you will agree will be able to demonstrate a realistic appreciation of the challenges of teaching in a state school.
     
  9. Teacher training is geared to teaching in state schools, even though some end up teaching in the independent sector. The qualification you aim at - QTS - is only compulsory in state schools. You will learn about national curriculum (mandatory in state schools but not in private), behaviour management (not so much a problem in indy) and great diversity of pupils in attaiment, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds.
    As I've said, to increase your daughter's chances of success, she needs to gain extensive experience in state schools as TA or volunteering; failing that, at least several weeks of up-to-date school experience and reflection on it.
     
  10. All your comments are interesting reading and to be honest nothing that isn't available on many sites regarding the requirements for teacher training, but it does seem that assumptions are made in general. In our case my daughter is not solely privately educated. The system does seem to assume that those with an education that not UK based state cannot understand what the UK state system is like. I certainly wouldn't accept decisions based on such flawed biased reasoning, from my students, would/do you?
     
  11. Employers usually shortlist applicants with experience.
    A PGCE is basically a training course leading to a job and why should the same selection criteria not apply. Those with the experience which closely matches the job are selected for training.
     
  12. Whilst I completely understand the frustration of your daughter, I do agree with what they're saying to be honest. I currently teach in a Thai school and it's so completely different to a UK state school. If you haven't been to a UK state school or worked/volunteered in one, you won't really have a basic understanding of it. I know that she can't change her education but I'm sure that if she went and got either paid or voluntary experience in a UK state primary school she wouldn't have this problem with applying next year. I wish her all the best of luck.
     

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