1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

PGCE primary interview

Discussion in 'Primary' started by steph21811, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. Hi guys,

    Please can you help? I have to plan an activity for a mixed ability group of children in year 2/3. It has to last 20 minutes and I'm not sure where to start.

    Also, any interview tips?

    Thank you
     
  2. busola93

    busola93 New commenter

    You could do a short maths lesson, where you display a bunch of numbers on the board, and then different statements like my moms age, the number of days in the year etc, and then you get the children to match the number to the statements. They will then have to explain their answers, lots of opportunity for discussion and mathematical reasoning. Hope that makes sense! If not let me know and I'll send you a full example
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    As I say to anyone in this situation, you need to 'play to your own strengths'. It has to be something you're confident delivering and even better passionate about and then that will shine through during your observation. Because that's what they're looking for at this point -have you the potential to become a good teacher?

    I would start by thinking subject-wise, where is your own strength? then go online and find out the year group expectation for y2/3 in that subject. Choose something you feel confident in and then think of an activity to deliver the 'expected outcome'.
     
  4. epopemsie_93

    epopemsie_93 New commenter

    I completely agree with Lara. I recently secured my NQT post and I started to over think my observation lesson as I had free reign to choose any subject and any focus - as someone with far too many ideas swimming in my head, this was a battle!

    As soon as I relaxed and came up with a simple, but effective, lesson that played to my strengths and showed off who I claimed to be in my application, I was much more confident and it worked well - the interviewers specifically commented that they respected that my lesson mirrored my application so I'd say definitely think about what you put in there.

    It definitely wasn't perfect, but then it never will be - especially when you know nothing about the children. They told me afterwards that they were looking for how well I engaged, inspired and worked with the children, focussing on assessments I made throughout the lesson and the subsequent evaluation/reflections of my lesson became a focus in the interview.

    I'm certainly no expert, but these were some of my experiences. Be yourself, play to your strengths and you'll be fine. They need to like you for who you are, so show them that and you'll all be investing in something with mutual respect :)
     
    Lara mfl 05 and (deleted member) like this.

Share This Page