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PGCE coming to my class

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by Sparky1985, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. I am getting a new PGCE student in a couple of weeks for their 2nd placement (primary). This is my school's first time taking a PGCE from this uni- I am completing their mentor training next week (I have previously done the training for another uni).
    I want to be as organised as possible when the PGCE starts so they have a positive placement from start to finish, My class are great although they have a tendency to go mad for anyone but me but I will be around and in the room so am sure it will be fine.
    ~What I would love is if you PGCEs this year could tell me the things/info you wished your mentor had chatted to you about/given you at the start to help you get through the placement and get the most out of it.
    The uni have been very lax about sending us info- I dont know gender of PGCE and havent received 1st placement evaluation/targets yet
     
  2. I am getting a new PGCE student in a couple of weeks for their 2nd placement (primary). This is my school's first time taking a PGCE from this uni- I am completing their mentor training next week (I have previously done the training for another uni).
    I want to be as organised as possible when the PGCE starts so they have a positive placement from start to finish, My class are great although they have a tendency to go mad for anyone but me but I will be around and in the room so am sure it will be fine.
    ~What I would love is if you PGCEs this year could tell me the things/info you wished your mentor had chatted to you about/given you at the start to help you get through the placement and get the most out of it.
    The uni have been very lax about sending us info- I dont know gender of PGCE and havent received 1st placement evaluation/targets yet
     
  3. I'm a Secondary PGCE but I think some things are the same. The things that helped me most was a pack of information relating to the school - policies (behaviour and stuff but also dress code and what to do if you're going to be late / absent), a staff list so I could find out who was who, a map of the school and a timetable of the school day. Although some people might find this overwhelming, it helped me to feel that my mentor was in control and interested in being helpful (not all my placements have created this atmosphere!)
    As you're getting a second placement student perhaps chatting about what they feel went well at their first placement will help them to feel confident on the first meeting and you can discuss targets later?
    Other than that, finding out where the loos is generally a concern and a cup of tea always helps me to feel more at ease. Good luck and I hope the placement goes well for both of you!
     
  4. rachyclaire

    rachyclaire New commenter

    I'm on a 14-19 course, and currently in placement in a college, but hopefully some of this will relate to primary as well. For me, I found particularly in my 2nd placement (started after xmas) was that I wasn't told really basic things that seemed really obvious to the tutors about the way they worked, for example, at the start of a new unit they always give the students a copy of the front page of the unit content, the class were v. confused when they didnt get one from me! So tell your student everything you can think of about the way you work, even if it sounds silly! (Same goes for info about pupils, any SEN, likes/dislikes, background info etc!)
    Try and tell them as early as possible what you expect them to teach, in my first placement it took about 3 weeks before I had my timetable sorted whereas in my 2nd I had it on the first day, and it makes sooo much difference.

     

  5. Hi Sparky

    I think it is great that you have posted to find out information to help your student! If only all mentors were as nice and helpful as you!
    Have a list of all the children's name, children with S.E.N, and levels etc ready for them. A timetable, medium term plans and information about school behaviour policy.
    Try and ask them as soon as possible what it is that they need to teach/observe so that your student can create a timetable. If possible, give them your email address and mobile number so that they can contact you if they need any advice. Please offer to have a look at their plans (if only at the start). On my first placement my teacher refused to look at mine!
    Ask them about particular targets that they want to work on. My metor in my current placement (2nd) is fab. My area of weakness is behaviour management and so she used as many behaviour management strategies as possible in her lessons for me to observe and she also suggested teachers which I could go and observe.
    Hope this helps, if I can think of anything else then I will let you know!
     
  6. rachyclaire

    rachyclaire New commenter

    Just to add - have a look through the standards with them, and see what they've got so far and what they need from this placement!
     
  7. I think it's fantastic you are this keen to help your student so well done you!
    I'm a PGCE Primary student so I'll tell you things that really helped me on my last placement and things I would love to be repeated on my next placement.
    1 - My mentor checked with me first and then got me teaching during my observation week - just little things, but getting me up in front of the whole class, running his starter activity or his lesson. It took the pressure away from me initially but helped build my confidence whilst getting to know the children. I got to focus on one or two issues at a time rather than having to handle everything at once.
    2 - When I took my first proper lesson with the class my mentor asked me whether I wanted him to stay or not. I had a preference that he leave and it helped me relax with the children before I was being observed. He made it clear that he was on hand if I needed him though! It helped me massively as it allowed me to establish a teaching relationship with the children and made me realise that I could 'handle' the class by myself. Then I could start worrying about other things!
    3 - Constant praise. I know it sounds obvious but it's key. I had massive doubts about my ability to teach but my mentor would constantly refer to the things I did well. He'd repeat them again and again and I clung on to them in my bad moments. Obviously be honest, but don't forget to praise the positives! When you give constructive criticism, make sure it is exactly that - tell them how to improve.
    4 - Get to know the student whilst they are observing - find out about their experience with children as that may help you support them better. For example, I worked as a TA for three years and ran a phonics programme to support children in upper KS2 who were poor readers and spellers. The class I was in had similar issues and the teacher was looking at implementing some sort of support. My mentor asked me about my experiences which helped me feel like I was contributing (students are aware that you don't HAVE to do this!)
    5 - Let your student know when you are free for them to talk to BUT still seek them out - as I said, we know you're busy people and some times it's nice for the mentor to give you a different window of opportunity.
    6 - Biggest thing - discuss things with your student. My mentor never made me do anything I was uncomfortable with - we do need a bit of a push some times but confidence is key and if we don't feel ready for something, maybe we aren't. Remind the student that they will need to do x by <some kind of time frame>. They have time to prepare themselves for it then.
     
  8. dkarana

    dkarana New commenter

    I just want to say that you are going to be a great mentor.
    I am a PGCE in my second placement my tutor is also doing this for the first time and she wants to help me in everyway.She is a wonderful teacher/person and well organised.I hope I won't let her down.I am sure your student/trainee will do her/his best just by learning from your attitude.
    One very important suggestion,just try to keep an eye on the behaviour of your co-teachers which can be nasty and spoil her/his experience without any fault of yours.Speaking from my experience, wish my mentor in the first school would have been more vigilant.He was proactive once he knew though.
    Good luck!
     

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