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PGCE Classics

Discussion in 'Classics' started by Quintus_est_in_horto, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. Hi all,
    I'm currently in my first year of university studying Classical Literature and Civilisation and am looking at what I would need for a PGCE course in order to teach at secondary level. I've looked at the Cambridge and King's information on their course and King's state "Your level of Latin will need to be AS level grade B or the equivalent."
    I studied Latin until GCSE gaining an A grade but was unable to continue to the Sixth Form due to subject timetable clashes. I'm taking Greek this year and will probably continue Latin next year from GCSE standard. Has anyone else been in the same situation in that they don't have an AS/A Level Latin qualification? I know there are summer schools which offer courses in languages but wonder if I could continue studying it to the equal standard, just without the specific qualification.
    I'm planning on contacting the King's and Cambridge departments at some point, but any helpful advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Hi all,
    I'm currently in my first year of university studying Classical Literature and Civilisation and am looking at what I would need for a PGCE course in order to teach at secondary level. I've looked at the Cambridge and King's information on their course and King's state "Your level of Latin will need to be AS level grade B or the equivalent."
    I studied Latin until GCSE gaining an A grade but was unable to continue to the Sixth Form due to subject timetable clashes. I'm taking Greek this year and will probably continue Latin next year from GCSE standard. Has anyone else been in the same situation in that they don't have an AS/A Level Latin qualification? I know there are summer schools which offer courses in languages but wonder if I could continue studying it to the equal standard, just without the specific qualification.
    I'm planning on contacting the King's and Cambridge departments at some point, but any helpful advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
     
  3. lemoni122

    lemoni122 New commenter

    I've known students get admitted who don't have the actual AS or A2 qualification, but the fact that they have studied modules in both Latin and Greek as part of their Class Civ course at univ (which goes well beyond GCSE) has allowed them onto a PGCE course.
    Going to the residential summer schools is most helpful, for in 2 weeks, you can gain a year's knowledge. You can probably get a grant towards the costs from Friends of the Classics and maybe your univ would help too.
    I would contact the two Education Departments sharpish. Don't put it off, for they can advise you on how you can ameliorate your situation over the next two years. Taking the Greek already shows you're serious.
    But remember when you go for job interviews, you are bound to be at a disadvantage when competing against candidates with double honours in Classical Languages. Also you are most unlikely to be able to teach prose composition at a high level, so there goes your chances of teaching at Eton and its ilk. But there's a lot of assistance (though of variable quality) on the net to help someone a bit wobbly succeed at teaching translation and comprehension from Latin, even at A Level, and you may be a born teacher, whose gaps in knowledge will be filled as you go along.
    Go for it! I'm very glad you are considering teaching our brilliant subject.
     
  4. Hello,
    I lack an A level in Latin, and have won a place at Cambridge this week. I start in September, having only been advised to take the A level, not told I have to. My advice to you would be to study Latin as part of your degree and <u>get plenty of work experience</u>.
    Hope that helps :eek:)
     
  5. I didn't have an A level in Latin - only a Higher - and I did an Ancient History degree at uni with no language content. I decided early on that I wanted to teach so attended Latin grammar lectures and tutorials as an extra and went to a JACT Latin summer before my final year. I also spent two summers at the UCC in Cork, at their Ancient Classics summer school. It is about 8 weeks long in total, but I only went for 6 weeks initially after Uni and for 2 weeks after my PGCE. Both times I received substantial bursarie. It was a particulary good course as it was aimed at Post Grads, whereas the JACT courses are mainly for Sixth Formers.
    The fact that I was able to show I had made an effort to get my Latin up to standard before my PGCE got me on the course, and then I continued to enhance my knowledge at the summer schools and as part of the PGCE. I'm in my 8th year of teaching, teach up to A2 and get jolly good results!
    Good luck.
     
  6. A former pupil of mine did her Latin A level while working in publishing. She got a fantastic grade and is now a HOD!
     
  7. BGB

    BGB

    For all budding Classics teachers - the most important talent is the ability to teach Classics with enthusiasm and inspiration. I am head of classics at a large independent school and have been at three others. When we advertise for a classics teacher we have endless applications from PhD students and all manner of classicists with more qualifications than you can poke a stick at. As a rule of thumb I've learned that the more Classics qualifications someone has the less likely they are to be able to teach classics.

    Classics is a subject under threat, it needs motivated teachers with an absolute belief in the validity and importance of their subject. If you don't have A/AS level Latin I don't care, so long as you know it by the time you come to interview and can teach it like a possessed demon. Plenty of degrees require a high level of Classics that easily surpasses A level (ancient history, class civ, egyptology, even medieval history at some universities, to name but a few), so don't worry about your school qualifications - be sure you can teach. That's not just my opinion, but the opinion shared by all my colleagues that head up other Classics departments. The average Classics ad in the TES receives 2 to 3 applications at best - as the saying goes it's very hard to find good people, especially in classics, so if you are that good person then you've got a job coming your way.

    Hope that helps.

    PS: An ability to teach Greek is a big bonus.
     
  8. The numbers applying for jobs in the secondary school sector for Classics is higher than reported above, especially in the independent sector, and in the SE in particular.
     

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