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Permanent contact confusion!

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by jojo555, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. I need help! I've been employed in the same school for four years without a contract. During the last two months of employment I was on maternity leave. Before I left I was told by my union that my leave wouldn't be considered a break in service. I went back to work after nine months and was then told by my principal that I didn't qualify for my permanent status. Is he right? I am paid at a daily rate.

    If anyone can shed any light on this I'd be really grateful!
     
  2. I need help! I've been employed in the same school for four years without a contract. During the last two months of employment I was on maternity leave. Before I left I was told by my union that my leave wouldn't be considered a break in service. I went back to work after nine months and was then told by my principal that I didn't qualify for my permanent status. Is he right? I am paid at a daily rate.

    If anyone can shed any light on this I'd be really grateful!
     
  3. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    Are you employed directly by the school or is it via an agency?
    If employed directly by the school (as I suspect) are you there on a full time basis with a regular timetable or are you called in on an "Ad Hoc" basis to cover for absent colleagues? If it is the latter case then your principle is probably correct.
     
  4. Hi, thanks for the reply.
    I'm employed directly by the school and I've been teaching the same class for four years.
     
  5. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    It's a bit of a funny one this, as daily supply you have no legal entitlement even if employed for a length of time. Your union should be fighting this one for you and should have been doing so for some time.
    I don't understand why there is no contract. Are you paid over the holidays? Did you receive your full maternity entitlement?
     
  6. The union has said that because I've been treated like any other teacher in the school I should be given the same rights. He wasn't paying me for holidays but he did pay me sick pay. I also did prep work in august for each new class that I was teaching that year. I was never interviewed for the job. Instead I was employed for six weeks as a supply teacher and then asked to stay on. I finished the academic year and was then asked back for the second year. It was always assumed that I would come back year after year. He told me that I could request permanency after four years. I was given full maternity pay and it was assumed that I would come back to teach there after my leave had ended.
     
  7. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    Strictly speaking, after 4 years your contract should become permanent. Where the confusion lies here is whether or not you have a contract in the first instance.
    Your union needs to sort this one out for you. If you were not paid through the holidays, that would seem to be no contract but you were on daily rate.
    First of all get confirmation from your employer that you are on contract, then start negotiating permanency. Most of all get a contract, there is a serious risk here of no employment rights, ie you can't be made redundant because you don't have a contract, you could in theory be told not to come back tomorrow.
     

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