1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Perceptions

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by Happy_Daze, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. Am currently teaching English as an Additional Language at a secondary school in Canada, but hope to return to international school teaching next fall. My B.Ed. specialized in in English Language Arts, but due to a recent immigration boom in our province, and the fact that I have a CELTA, I've been working with English language learners for the past three years.
    Here, EAL/ESL teachers are considered specialists, must have additional qualifications, and are in high demand. A former colleague from the U.K. that I taught with in Cairo mentioned that ESL specialists at her school were paid less than other teachers on staff. She advised me to market myself as an English teacher with ESL qualification rather than an ESL teacher when applying for overseas teaching jobs.
    Thoughts? Certainly a B.Ed. holder with a CELTA wouldn't be considered the same as a backpack-toting ESL teacher, would they?


     
  2. Am currently teaching English as an Additional Language at a secondary school in Canada, but hope to return to international school teaching next fall. My B.Ed. specialized in in English Language Arts, but due to a recent immigration boom in our province, and the fact that I have a CELTA, I've been working with English language learners for the past three years.
    Here, EAL/ESL teachers are considered specialists, must have additional qualifications, and are in high demand. A former colleague from the U.K. that I taught with in Cairo mentioned that ESL specialists at her school were paid less than other teachers on staff. She advised me to market myself as an English teacher with ESL qualification rather than an ESL teacher when applying for overseas teaching jobs.
    Thoughts? Certainly a B.Ed. holder with a CELTA wouldn't be considered the same as a backpack-toting ESL teacher, would they?


     
  3. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    This makes sense for the reason she gave you. Your letter of application will need to make it clear that you offer the full range of English skills including literature.
    Safer to assume that the person reading your application is either A) a gormless eejit who doesn't know the difference or B) an unscrupulous barbarian who'll always try to buy Maseratis at Mini prices.
     
  4. Sadly many people do not know the difference in the skills set between English teaching and EAL. At my previous school in the UK, I really had to fight to employ an EAL specialist as the view seemed to be that English teachers should be able to teach EAL (yes we can, but not necessarily very well!) Sadly many people, even the better educationalists, seem to think that if you can speak a language, you can teach it.
    International schools should be more enlightened but don´t bank on it. Sell yourself as both.
     
  5. Thanks for the words of wisdom, Mainwaring. Time to revamp my letter of application and start marketing the Masarati!
     
  6. Ah yes...all native English speakers can teach ESL. Likewise, it seems many secondary schools here assume that anyone can teach English. English departments are full of Phys-Ed, Math, and senior Science teachers that teach one section of English. My teacher's certificate is K-12 all subjects, but I certainly wouldn't want to throw one class of Physics into the ESL/English mix!
    That's my wee rant...
     
  7. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    Fortunately as HoD English back in Chaucer's day I managed to convince my HT that English should ONLY be taught by us English teachers.
    ...but as a Deputy and Head I have to confess that I've taught (i.e. filled in temporary gaps in) most subjects, including Physics.
     
  8. ..and I've taught English. Sorry, M, was I not entitled? Or capable? Just because I prefer the smell of plimpsole and the sound of twenty thundering showers, doesn't mean I can't tell a kid where a comma should go, does it?
    Fair enough, if I was asked to explain Dickens or Shakespeare, I would struggle not to urge the kids to go the way of scary Stephen King...

     
  9. Oh dear, now that's not good.
    I've recently been paying a lot of attention to the TES science forum and have noticed that even some Physics teachers don't really understand Physics.
    I wouldn't be able to teach English and would never try.
     
  10. It's physics, Roberto, and well you know it!
     
  11. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Applied maths at best is an apt description.

     
  12. I should have known this was a rough playground! Please be kind, I'm new at this... [​IMG]
    I may have mispoke. I had no intention of implying that teachers are not entitled to (or capable of) crossing curricular boundaries, I was just offering an observation of the hierarchy of school subjects in my current location. Science or Math departments wouldn't be too keen to invite an English teacher to pick up one of their courses yet English departments are filled with teachers that spend 80 percent of their contact time elsewhere.
    Peace.


     
  13. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    A lot more capable than I was at teaching PE but my first choice would always be the cobbler to his last.
     
  14. Yeah, but look at his thumbs...
     

Share This Page