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PE for all.

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by srhclrksn, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Hi, I am doing a small scale research trying to find effective strategies for ensuring that primary PE is for all. Has anyone got good strategies to motivate the non sporty? Do you think PE lessons should include an element of competition? I would love to recieve any comments regarding primary PE in general or any suggestions of effective strategies. Many thanks.
     
  2. Hi, I am doing a small scale research trying to find effective strategies for ensuring that primary PE is for all. Has anyone got good strategies to motivate the non sporty? Do you think PE lessons should include an element of competition? I would love to recieve any comments regarding primary PE in general or any suggestions of effective strategies. Many thanks.
     
  3. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    A little too vague and broad to know how to respond.
    What small scale research is this? are you employed already and doing it within a school or are you in HE and doing a piece of coursework?
    What is the end purpose of this research?
    What specifically is it that you want us to help with?
     
  4. I have worked in school as a HLTA teaching PE whilst covering PPA and have taken the plunge and am now in my final year of teacher training. My research is for an assignment, we have to write a journal style article. I am focusing on invasion games asking - PE for All: What are the most effective strategies to motivate pupils to fully engage in physical education? (focusing on the non sporty) I will touch on if competition has a place in PE lessons as Grove is considering making PE more competitive and also the government cuts in relation to sport. Also childhood obesity and whether if a child has a positive experience during school PE does this encourage them to partake in sport outside school.
    I have interview children at the school where I used to work asking their views and also interviewed teachers along with the PE co ordinator. I will also use my own experiences.
    I put a post on this site as the school where I have based my research is only small and I would appreciate additional input. So far I have found that, as a whole, children do enjoy competition but would also like more choice with regards to equipment. Teachers who I have interviewed tend to group children whilst children preferred to choose their groups.
    I asked teachers:
    What strategies have you used to motivate pupils in PE lessons to ensure all pupils are fully engaged?
    Do you think teachers own attitudes and actions affect children's relationship with sport?
    If a child is reluctant to join in, how do you address this issue?
    Thank you so much for responding, I hope this has narrowed it down a little.



     
  5. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    First off I hate the term 'non sporty'. Non sporty is sometimes someone who prefers music / drama, but more often it is someone who has received poor PE provision at primary school.
    Of course competition has a place. Games are there to play and win.
    Effective strategies - make sure the pupils have plenty of PE/Games each week. Get them playing sport and set up competition for them to play in. Make sure this happens from Y3.
    Childhood obesity - again it's the children who receive poor PE provision. Motivate a child in Y3 and you've got them hooked.
    Government cuts - spot on. All this money on sports partnerships and yet only 10 pupils from my school are allowed to take part in a basketball tournament. Sport for all? Give me the money and I will set up a league for all schools in the local area that ALL pupils can attend.
    The problem is we faff about too much. We talk about obesity because it creates a 'healthy living officer' job title for someone. We moan about competition because we worry kids will be traumatised if they lose. Staff in primary schools have to toughen up, roll up their sleeves and get outside in a tracksuit with a whistle and let the kids run about. It does not need specialist staff (unless you're teaching specialist sports) it just requires someone with good pupil management skills. If primary staff can't do this then frankly they should not be in the job. Any other subject (science, maths etc) they would be sent on a booster course to top up their knowledge and understanding. But because it's PE/Games there is a culture of 'that's not me' and the SSPs have made it worse by sending in staff to do it for them ('it's OK as someone does the lesson for me').
     
  6. Thank you for your response, your comments give me plenty to think about.

     

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