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Pay Appeals

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by outmth123, Nov 1, 2018.

?

Anybody won a pay appeal?

  1. Yes

    50.0%
  2. No

    50.0%
  1. outmth123

    outmth123 New commenter

    Anyone ever appealed a prevention of pay progression and won?
     
  2. livingstone83

    livingstone83 Occasional commenter

    As a union rep a supported 16 members. None where overturned.

    Neither was mine.

    I haven’t heard of it being overturned either. Not round where I am.
     
  3. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    Sort of - agreed to a partial pay rise to avoid having to go to the hearing.felt a bit pressured in to doing so, and union rep was confident I would have won (which is why head offered partial pay rise - if he thought his case was strong why offer me anything?) I now regret not going to the hearing.
     
  4. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    The NAS says it has a high success rate of over turning pay progression decisions, largely because schools are just tying it on. Unless there have been a significant concerns raised about your performance and support offered during the cycle, you should go through. Don’t let your school use performance management to control its budget.
     
    henrypm0 and midnight_angel like this.
  5. Teacher_abc123

    Teacher_abc123 New commenter

    Overturned meaning the appeal was lost?
     
  6. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    That is how it used to be, but schools can now set their own criteria for moving up. STPCD only says that teachers should be paid somewhere between the two limits, and that schools should have a policy to decide where. Indeed, there is not even any mention of pay points, so there is nothing to 'go through' to. A school could have 6 main scale points as before, or even 26, or just do everything in money terms. Some LAs and schools have used something similar to the old system, but they don't have to.
     
    JohnJCazorla likes this.
  7. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide


    Also if on STPCD the requirement is:

    The [school] must decide how pay progression will be determined, subject to the following:

    a) the decision whether or not to award pay progression must be related to the teacher’s performance, as assessed through the school’s appraisal arrangements....
    Although that doesn't actually state 'if you meet your PM targets you will get a pay rise' I think a school would struggle (legally) to show it complied with this if you meet PM targets and don't move up the scale IF that's what your pay policy says.

    That said,union statistics about the chance of winning pay appeals may not be of much relevance to whether OP would win an appeal. The unions' statistics are not an unbiased (in the statistical sense) sample. It's quite possible the union supports the teachers with a high chance of success and dissuades those with little chance. We don't know which group OP falls in.
     
    JohnJCazorla likes this.
  8. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    As I said on another thread though, it’s a moving target - get good progress in GCSE results and they’ll dig out an RI. Get all Goods in lesson observations and they’ll say you need to contribute more to school life. The game is well and truly rigged.
     
  9. NQT08

    NQT08 Occasional commenter

    I didn't win mine but things were put in place from my complaints that meant I was successful the following year.

    If you aren't overly keen on confrontation, I would think it wouldn't be a nice experience.
     
  10. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    Yes, it has to be consistent with the pay policy. There is also the question as to how much a move up the scale may be.
     

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