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part time or full time- returning from maternity leave

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by pollycrisp, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. How do you make the decision about returning to work- what are the pros and cons for each?! i've heard about the difference returning full time makes if you want to try for another child in the next year- can anyone explain this in simple terms?! What are the implications if you return part time on money and future maternity leave. I'm currently thinking part time is best and full time when baby is 3 but just can't get my head round the money... any thoughts/ experienced voices?
     
  2. How do you make the decision about returning to work- what are the pros and cons for each?! i've heard about the difference returning full time makes if you want to try for another child in the next year- can anyone explain this in simple terms?! What are the implications if you return part time on money and future maternity leave. I'm currently thinking part time is best and full time when baby is 3 but just can't get my head round the money... any thoughts/ experienced voices?
     
  3. i worked full time after my first child was born. it was hard work, my husband works away from home during the week and it was quite stressful working full time and being a mum 24/7 for 5 days a week. (babies have no idea that you have a full-on day the next day when they are being sick/crying/won't sleep etc in the night!!!). i put in a request for flexible working (from full to 0.8 ) but this was rejected by the governors. you might want to raise the possibility of part time work with your HT during your pregnancy (unsure of your position at the moment whether you ar currently trying/pregnant/on mat leave) to seee whether there is the possibility of reducing yiour hours. It is a request and it is not a 'right' to go part time. people will say its best to stay full time becasue if you do go for baby 2, then obviously your ML for that baby will be based on full time pay.
    I am now in a position where i have two children. in sept i went back to work after my 2nd ML and now work part time (voluntary redundancy rather than making a request for reduction in hours). I do feel that i have more time at home but equally the days i am in work are much much busier trying to make sure that i cram everything i need to in. obv my PPA is shorter and i currently get 90 mins a week for a 3 day week.
    You said that ideally you would like to return to full time when baby is 3. I am not sure on the legalities here but i had to sign a new part time contract when i got my reduction in hours. therefore i can only return to full time hours if there is a vacancy within the school that i apply for and get or i apply for fulltime jobs elsewhere.
    there are definate pros and cons - the biggest being that on part time hours i get 2 days with my youngest daughter and we can meet up with friends with babies, go to playgroup or do that big cleaning job that keeps getting put off!!!!!
    hope some of that helps
     
  4. I worked part-time before I had my son and HATED it. This was in KS1 where the teacher has a lot of 'care' over the class, if you know what I mean i.e. working with very young, needy children and their parents.
    0.5 is never half a job really, unless you have a shop, office, factory post where you clock in and out and do nothing at home. I felt that planning with/for someone else was tricky and that by my end of the week, everything had changed. We spent hours on the phone and I had to stay late every Fri to get all the books marked because of course I couldn't take them home. \you have to be tight on what you manage to get done so that you don't fall behind for the other person; there is no slacking or 'oh, I'll leave that til .....'. Also, differing styles of behaviour management can be an issue - children, their parents and other staff trying to 'play' you off against each other.
    You have to be very strict about not checking emails on your days off and making sure you actually don't work on your days off as what happened to me was that I ws on school 0.5 and being paid 0.5 but ending up working most other days too.
    I then went back to FT as the opp came up before I had my son so I knew that after he was born I would go back FT too - a decision which I never regret. No 2 is on the way and I plan to go back FT after he is born. I just prefer to be my own 'boss' as such, and not to have to depend on anyone else (or for them to depend on me). Maybe secondary teaching is not so difficult? not sure, but I feel that in primary school it is hard - or maybe I'm just a control freak LOL. Sorry to sound so negative!
    I would say go back FT and see how you feel as you can always ask to go PT if you don't like it but if you go back PT and don't like it then you'll probably have to wait until a FT post arises in your school before you can swap back.
    Good luck with your decision whatever you decide!
     
  5. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Let us know about the new arrival. Must have happened by now, I guess.
    Don't even think about work whilst recovering from the birth and adjusting to motherhood.
    My sister trained as a teacher in the year after having her son (with a 6 year old as well). She intended looking for apart-time job and was offered one but when she did the calculations on take-home pay, childcare costs and petrol costs found that she'd be paying about £30 per month from savings to go to work! She declined the job and took a f/t one instead.
    She did salary sacrifice to buy childcare vouchers from pay before tax so saved a worthwhile amount of money through paying less tax.
    If you are thinking of having a second child fairly close tot he first, going back f/t is definitely worth considering as you'd get the maximum maternity pay second time around instead of pay based on a lower salary.
    A teacher who wrote a weekly article for TES some years ago went on ML and was pregnant when she returned to work 12 months after the birth. She served the summer holidays and a few term-time weeks back at work on full pay and then went back on ML.
     
  6. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    The financial implications for future maternity leave should you go part time now are that obviously your maternity pay next time will be less. The amount your are entitled to is calculated on your earnings at fixed dates within your pregnancy period prior to maternity leave commencing, and so the 90% and 50% of salary calculations will be based on your part time hours.
     

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