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parental expectations

Discussion in 'Personal' started by juliehenry, May 24, 2012.

  1. juliehenry

    juliehenry New commenter

    I have a parent at school who is asking us to put eye drops into her child's eyes every hour. He has a long term condition and really does need eye drops but the parent is making the teacher's life very uncomfortable in general and makes complaints about the teacher's medical treatment of her child. Would the unions say that we as teachers/ staff should NOT be doing this? The parent lives a taxi ride away and does not work. What do we think please??
     
  2. juliehenry

    juliehenry New commenter

    I have a parent at school who is asking us to put eye drops into her child's eyes every hour. He has a long term condition and really does need eye drops but the parent is making the teacher's life very uncomfortable in general and makes complaints about the teacher's medical treatment of her child. Would the unions say that we as teachers/ staff should NOT be doing this? The parent lives a taxi ride away and does not work. What do we think please??
     
  3. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I don't think it is reasonable to expect the parent to turn up at school every hour.
    Is there a school nurse to do it?
    Is the child too young to do it?
     
  4. You're right- teachers should not be doing this. At least it's just the child's eyes which are the focus of the problem. 20 years or so ago a colleague knew of a teacher in a local special school who had to insert suppositories to control a child's epilepsy.
     
  5. I've known of Primary teachers who have been expected (by parents, not SLT) to change kids' nappies. ***, if they are old enough to go to school they're old enough to be toilet trained. You can house train a kitten or puppy in a couple of weeks!
    As for the OP, take union advice, but I think that the answer is that teachers are not expected to, in fact could be breaking the law if they do, administer medicenes.
    .
    cyolba, only ready to give kids kicks up the backside, not suppositories :)
     
  6. juliehenry

    juliehenry New commenter

    No school nurse; We are a junior school and parent doesn't feel child is able to do it.

     
  7. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    The parent is probably highly stressed and worried about poorly child - perhaps the head teacher could offer to do it?
     
  8. I used to have a child in my class with something like this prescribed - thankfully his TA had been trained in what to do and no one ever offered/remembered/bothered to bring me up to speed (and he never needed them anyway).
    We've been on the other end of it with my brother who basically needed some eczema cream reapplying at midday and the school wouldn't help, even in the form of overseeing him doing it. Couldn't easily be resolved since my mum was tied up at work next city across - so he just spent the afternoons very itchy, sore and uncomfortable when he had a flare up.
     
  9. Sorry to be a bit dense, but is the suggestion that administering medication to a child having a seizure is somehow beyond people's ability? Or just their level of compassion? My son has epilepsy, fortunately well controlled, but if he were to have a severe seizure then I would hope that any reasonable adult would be prepared to help him - let alone one who chose to work in a special school.


    I worked with a child who had daily eye drops (not hourly thankfully) last year - administering them is pretty quick and easy. Maybe someone in the office/a first aider could do it? Maybe someone each day so that it's not too burdensome on one member of staff?


    What would you hope for if it was just your child's eyes?
     
  10. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Given that we're not allowed to give them a plaster to apply themselves, why would anyone take it upon themselves to administer a medicine?
     
  11. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    Aren't we? I'd be happy to, but I would prefer it if I had gloves.
     
  12. juliehenry

    juliehenry New commenter

    If it was my child's eyes, i would appreciate the teacher going out of her way to help by giving the drops every hour and not continually moan about how it's being done/ not done! The drops are cleaning drops which the child tells us are not being given at home and the parent has already been in almost daily for the last year to say that the child has been nearly blinded by the way they were given or not given in other cases. She picks fault in everything that we do to try to help the situation and the teacher involved is at the end of her tether with this constant criticism. We are teachers and ALWAYS go the extra mile for the children in our care but it becomes a very difficult and somewhat frightening situation when parents accuse you of hurting their child when you are trying to help?
     
  13. Yes it does! I didn't pick that up from your original post. The little girl I worked with had similar - but less extreme - parents too. School was expected to do everything, while they did nothing at home. I guess you just have to keep remembering that you are doing the right thing by the child...
     
  14. Hourly applications of eye drops seems rather a lot! Wouldn't this have an impact on lessons and staffing? I work in a special school were many children require medication and we have had issues with parents making demands about medication that were not reasonable. The way it was dealt with was to only administer medication that is medically prescribed by a doctor.
    The parent has to complete a medicine administration form with very explicit details on when, how and how much to administer, and the prescribing doctor's name, address and telephone number. Also the medication that is sent into school has to have the pharmacy dispensing label on the packaging/container (so that we can see it is prescribed medication and not something bought over the counter because the parent has used Dr Google to 'diagnose' a condition of their choosing!).
    Then, depending on the nature and administration route of the medication, the school/specialist nurse is contacted and asked to provide training to a group of staff (usually TAs, unless it is rescue meds for epilepsy, etc). That way everyone is able to show that they have done everything possible to ensure that things are being done properly (****-covering exercise). I'd be concerned about administering something like eye drops without the 'protection' of some training - as a teacher and as a parent.
     
  15. In my case - since I also mentioned about the epilepsy stuff - it was a mainstream school and the parent in question was a particularly litigious one - there was no way on this universe I'd be doing anything to her child without training, and a paper trail proving the training had been carried out - because she was definitely the sort who'd be off to the solicitors if you saved her child's life but hadn't filled in form 19324b correctly.
     
  16. Ha ha ha ha ha.......
    Loving this. Not in a McDonalds way.

    Lelseydramaqueen - with a little bit of a crush on cyolba [​IMG]
     
  17. the evil tokoloshe

    the evil tokoloshe New commenter

    Totally agree with the above, I seem to remember that when I was at school the same applied and that was over thirty years ago. Certainly would not go anywhere near the situation without written and signed assurances of some sort from a quack and signed permission/request from the parent.
     
  18. juliehenry

    juliehenry New commenter

    Fantastic advice. Thanks so much.
     

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