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Parent who make sexual allegations

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by banoffeepie11, Jun 6, 2011.

  1. banoffeepie11

    banoffeepie11 New commenter

    I have just heard from some colleagues that a child who has been excluded permanently from another school may end up in my year 5 class next year. My headteacher is resisting the pressure from the LEA to take this child saying that the 1 space available in next September's Yr 5 year group, is being saved for an existing Yr 4 child presently off-role, who is expected to return then. I am worried that this may not be enough and the child will end up in my class.
    The child in question is supposed to be perfectly fine but his mother is a 'nightmare'. In the school from which the child has been excluded she was constantly making a huge amount of trouble on a daily basis, with each successive encounter becoming progressively worse. It finaly ended with her making allegations that her child was being sexually abused by his female teachers. The whole affair ended with the police being involved and teaching staff resigning due to breaking under the pressure of dealing with this imbalanced woman. The allegations where totally false. I have been told that the woman in question has in no way changed in her attitude and that she loves drama. I am starting to imaging that this woman has some kind of 'Munchausen by proxy' syndrome and fulfills her graving for attention through her son.
    I would appreciate any advice on how to deal practically with this situation should the worse case seniaro occur.
     
  2. banoffeepie11

    banoffeepie11 New commenter

    I have just heard from some colleagues that a child who has been excluded permanently from another school may end up in my year 5 class next year. My headteacher is resisting the pressure from the LEA to take this child saying that the 1 space available in next September's Yr 5 year group, is being saved for an existing Yr 4 child presently off-role, who is expected to return then. I am worried that this may not be enough and the child will end up in my class.
    The child in question is supposed to be perfectly fine but his mother is a 'nightmare'. In the school from which the child has been excluded she was constantly making a huge amount of trouble on a daily basis, with each successive encounter becoming progressively worse. It finaly ended with her making allegations that her child was being sexually abused by his female teachers. The whole affair ended with the police being involved and teaching staff resigning due to breaking under the pressure of dealing with this imbalanced woman. The allegations where totally false. I have been told that the woman in question has in no way changed in her attitude and that she loves drama. I am starting to imaging that this woman has some kind of 'Munchausen by proxy' syndrome and fulfills her graving for attention through her son.
    I would appreciate any advice on how to deal practically with this situation should the worse case seniaro occur.
     
  3. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Firstly, your primary duty is to the child, who by all accounts sounds as though they need some stability in their environment. Practically, I would have as little contact with the mother as possible, perhaps even request that the deputy head or head deal with them directly beyond anything more than cursory greeting. As a protective measure, I would also ensure that no member of staff is left in isolation with the child (basic safeguarding advice anyway, but obviously more important with this history) And, while it sounds patronising, remember that everyone deserves a clean slate - parent and child.
     
  4. No they don't. They deserve to be booted out of the system and left to beg on the street. By victimising teachers with the foulest of false allegations they lose all claim to consideration. I know the law says something else but the law is an ass. Natural justice would say - b@gger off.
     
  5. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Lead commenter Forum guide

    well, maybe, but he was permanently excluded for something, and it wasn't because of his mother's behaviour so he is going to need support.
    The Yr 4 child off roll isn't an existing pupil at yout school and they have no more priority on your vacancy than anyone else. If you have a vacancy in that year group and the excluded child's parents apply for it you have to give them the place (unless he has been permanently excluded twice), you can't 'reserve' empty places for someone else who hasn't applied yet. If they both apply and there's only one vacancy you apply your oversubscription criteria.
     
  6. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Yikes. And yet I know so many teachers who have made a mess up somehow and redeemed themselves with a successful second chance at getting their career back on track.....
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Unfortunately, the child cannot have a second chance without his parent and you cannot deny the child a place because of his parent. Mum may not deserve a second chance, but the child does.

    However he cannot possibly be 'perfectly fine' if he has been permanently excluded. It is fairly hard to be permanently excluded from primary, so either he did something really terrible as a one off or was a bit of a nightmare for a long time. Neither would make him 'perfectly fine',

    You cannot deny the child a place if you have one. If you are directed to take him then do a risk assessment with help and advice from your union and follow it to the letter.
     
  8. Jonntyboy

    Jonntyboy New commenter

    What's the betting this family is in a city or large town?
     
  9. And your point is? That the inbred yokels that inhabit rural areas wouldn't know how to go about sustaining a campaign of malice against teachers, or that out in the sticks they've never heard of sexual abuse?

    Sorry to be facetious, but that is just the most dreadfully inane comment, jonntyboy. What does it matter where they live?
     
  10. theNavigator

    theNavigator New commenter

    Fair point, although there is a higher concentration of "barking" in urban areas, merely due to higher population levels. I've often worked in rural areas, and the Scottish Islands - where the Idiot Hippy parents, or Religious Bonkers families tend to gravitate to. Then have feuds with other Idiot Hippies or Religious Bonkers, whilst the local crofters shake their heads and dream of personal Braveheart moments.
     
  11. Would that involve visiting the sins of the parent on the child?
     

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