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Parallel classes - what are the rules/criteria?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by dowager_countess, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Hi, I work in a 2-form entry school. Is there a criteria somewhere (perhaps Ofsted) that outlines the "rules" for year groups with more than one class? For example, is it essential that all objectives are exactly the same for all lessons, just the teaching is different?



    I'm asking because myself and my year group partner vary on opinion a lot, but this is all nice and friendly. So for example in literacy for information texts I recently did the unit building up to writing a information leaflet about the town the school is in (all planned/NC linked etc.) and the parallel teacher did what the Hamilton plans said to do (info about bugs and insects). This was allowed by the SMT but is it actually ok? I'm not doubting them, but we had very different outcomes in term sof work, but the objectives were similar in most cases. What do you think?
     
  2. inq

    inq

    We are expected tohave one set of planning that is identical between our 2 classes but how the lessons are taught often varies as we are different teachers. I don't think there is any official guidance as to what you have to do. As far as I know the only statutory thing is the National Curriculum. We are told by our SMT that all chilcren have to have the same opportunities so we have to teach to the same planning. With the introduction of a more thematic, children led curriculum we should, in theory, end up with slightly different outcomes but in practice it doesn't happen.
     
  3. Guess it depends on the school. I've had experience of both - one school we used same planning, other we did our own thing. Must admit, I preferred doing my own thing (although we did share ideas/resources) [​IMG]
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    No 'rules' at all. How could there be? All teachers and so pairs of teachers are different.

    I had the misfortune to work with a really rubbish teacher last year and no way on earth would I have been able to even think about teaching what she wanted to do. There was not anywhere near enough work in each lesson, nor was it challenging for the children at all. Not to mention being boring as hell. After about 4 weeks we stopped even trying to plan together at all and completely did our own thing.

    This year I work with a fabulous teacher, who also happens to have similar ideas about lessons and challenge to me, and we plan everything except maths together. They are joint plans containing ideas from both of us and so the children really do get the same thing in more or less the same way. It is great to be able to combine our classes sometimes and team teach if we feel like it. But also know that the other class is getting the same good teaching saves whinging from children.

    I prefer the working together, but not sure if it because of the combined planning or because it is way nicer to work with a good teacher than a rubbish one.
     
  5. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    I have different maths and english plans to the other Y6 teacher. We don't even do the same units/genres at the same time.

    We have pretty much the same foundation subject plans. I know the other year groups plan together but I like having the freedom to do it my way.
     
  6. We have four classes in each year group and share out the planning...it makes life a whole lot easier as I only have to plan literacy and have the rest done for me! We discuss the planning in our planning meetings and adapt as necessary. We organise the resources for each other too, including any photocopying.
     


  7. This is me at the moment! Thanks for the advice, makes me feel more confident about doing my own thing a lot of the time!
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    You have to do what is best for your class. If that is doing your own thing then so be it. Lowering your standards and expectations in order to be consistent is not acceptable.

    I would say that you need to be a bit careful about professional relations though.
     

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