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P/T supply questions...??

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Bowdie, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. I have a meeting with a head at a local school on Monday to discuss doing some supply work for the school, please can some help me out with the following so I am more prepared:

    I am on MS 6 pay scale - what would my hourly rates be ??

    If I am teaching say 10 hours, should they pay me one hour Planning and prep too ??

    Thank you in-advance for any help

    Bow
     
  2. M6 divided by 1265 is £24.92 per hour (but this would be for a contract and should include holidays in the period of emplyoyment).
    If contracted, you would be entitled to 10% PPA.
    If daily supply you wouldn't be entitled to holidays and PPA si pretty grey.
     
  3. Thankyou MrsC

    I don't think it will be a contract as I will be covering someone who is on long-time sick but I will be having to plan, and mark work etc.

    Would this make any difference ??
     
  4. In your situation your fairest choices are to work for either "day rate", which is equivalent to 6.48 hours and pays you holiday pay pro rate. or a short term contract, in which the dates include at least some holiday time.
    "Hourly rate" is a misused and LEA-exploitative approach. If you are paid hourly rate, make sure preparation and marking are built into the hours, ie not the 5.25 class contact hours that some LEAs pay day-to-day supply. 6.48 hours should be the number of hours.

     
  5. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Your day rate to scale on M6 (outside London) should be around £160, which divided by 6.48 (hours) is about £24 an hour.

    If you're paid through the LEA you should be able to make pension contributions to the TPA.
     
  6. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I would add that speaking for myself, if I'm paid as a full time teacher (ie to scale) I do my best to act like one, and I accept that extra hours on marking, meetings etc will be necessary. However, not everybody would agree with that.

    If I'm paid less, I work the hours they pay me for and no more.
     
  7. Very hard to do that in practice-leave the days' work unmarked in the case of schools that only pay classroom contact hours. It goes against the grain, and you know that you won't be invited back, because generally everyone, in the absence of a co-ordinated approach, will do the marking and take the future work instead of you. (The LEA legal department will argue anyway that the hourly rate is already taking marking into consideration.)

     
  8. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I hear what you're saying shalteir, but round my way it's either scale, flat rate or CS, so as far as I'm concerned it's a case of three levels of service - Gold, Silver, Bronze. If I were in a position to negotiate pay for a medium or long term job I'd make my case clear and if they didn't like it I'd take my chance on getting daily supply somewhere else instead. The way I see it is that a school paying flat rate is opting into paying me by the hour and is depriving me of scale income, so I have to spend my evenings and weekends making up the shortfall by other means.

    This is especially true of schools that once paid me to scale but have recently switched to flat rate. Same level of service for 30% less pay? Stuff that.

    I realise this attitude may become unsustainable in future but I plan to go down fighting ;-)
     
  9. I admire your stance but it isn't always possible to follow it. I have a whole term of supply at a school this term which I am very grateful for as I desperately need the money. But I am being paid a flat rate even though I have to attend all meetings, parents evenings, do all marking, assessment, planning, APP etc. I do feel they are getting a lot of work for their money as they are paying me very considerably under what I would get on contract. However, round here virtually all work is through agencies who all pay a flat rate. It's really hard.
     
  10. "but I plan to go down fighting ;-)"
    Me too. I haven't done any CS or ta work.


     

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