1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

P.E. and visual impairment.

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by charlotteday, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    Come Sept I will be working with a girl how has a sight impairment and another who is completely blind. I am really looking foward to the challenge and can't wait to get stuck in but was wondering if anyone has any ideas for activities I could do with them or ways that main stream P.E. could be adapted to include them in most sports. Any advice or suggestions would be realloy appreciated.
     
  2. Hi,
    Come Sept I will be working with a girl how has a sight impairment and another who is completely blind. I am really looking foward to the challenge and can't wait to get stuck in but was wondering if anyone has any ideas for activities I could do with them or ways that main stream P.E. could be adapted to include them in most sports. Any advice or suggestions would be realloy appreciated.
     
  3. A few years ago we had some VI students -goalball is popular played indoor with benches and a large ball with bell in. Fully sighted players can join in by wearing blindfolds. I am sure you will get info on the internet about it.
     
  4. Thank you for your reply I will give it a go with them :) x
     
  5. blobcarp

    blobcarp New commenter

    Goalball is supposed to be a big hit with everyone due to having to blindfold the sighted students! Just keep a look out (no pun intended) for any adapted equipment such as bell balls (as used in goalball) and its very important you find out from the child themselves what they can see when you are in the facility you are using, what colours can they see the best, colour contrasts etc! if you are working outside and lo-and-behold the sun is out, make sure you position yourself facing the sun (as is probably better anyway with all students!!). I did a whole module at uni last year on visually impaired participants in sport so inbox me if you want any other advice or information :)
     
  6. Hi
    thanks for your advise thats been really useful to me over the last few lessons. I also have a girl who is totally bling. Any advice of things to do with her as she is very nervous of balls and is not really into sport.
    Thanks.
     
  7. blobcarp

    blobcarp New commenter

    What about trying target throwing? you could make a noise where the target is (e.g. a hoop/basket/goal) and then either feedback to her on the outcome or guide her through it by making a noise where it landed compared to the target (if she missed obviously!). You could try and introduce her into running and the perception of distances? This is something easily done for the whole class with blindfolds, a long piece of rope and a stereo/someones voice. Attach children to a rope that is tied to a tree for example and held at the other end by yourself or a TA (taking up the slack). Then either place a stereo so at a certain distance and get the children to stop as close to it as possible (running) or use someone making a noise if you don't have a stereo. This is also good for helping her to be able to run in a straight line. If she is scared of balls, try and introduce her to soft balls (you can get good ones that are hollow and are basically the shell of a ball but squash upon immediate impact but she still may struggle in that they don't make a noise! i would say that a big thing would be to build up her confidence really and you can only really do that by building up trust in that what you tell her about her surroundings is gospel (if you can't let her feel her way around the hall so she can build up her own picture of the environment) and slowly progressing her confidence in ball handling skills. hope this helps!
     

Share This Page