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Overseas Trained Teachers

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Miss53, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. Would you agree that there are many qualified teachers who were trained under the British Education System in their mother country, are here, with talents and expertise wasting away, whilst children are struggling with learning in our schools? Let's face it, they would be willing to take less pay just to get a job in the profession they love so dearly. But are barred by the red tapes. Some who have years of teaching experience and second to none training are required to do this and do that to get in, setting them back years in earning power. We are not saying that they should not be vetted, but, all this nonsense were NARIC decides the value of their qualification is insulting and undermining.


    Believe me, I would like some of our teachers here to go to places like Jamaica and see what teacher training is all about. I cannot see how teachers are qualified to teach after one year of training in a country like this. In Jamaica for example, it use to be three years and I was told that it is now four. You might argue that in Britain it is not one year. But I say it is. The degree under normal circumstances takes three years. That degree is more or less theoretical. This is follwed by the almighty PGCE which is a one year course of what? From the first year in a teacher training college in Jamaica there is teaching practice right through. In earlier times trainee teachers had to do a whole year internship before he or she got qualification status and they had better pass that too.


    The next derogatory thing is to ask mature and qualified teachers to have an equivalence in GCSE Maths, English and Science especially if they were trained say in the 70s. These are people who were teaching these subjects for years and moreover they could not dear apply for a place at the teachers colleges, in Jamaica for example, without first passing those subjects in the country's recognised examinations. Maths is Maths, English is English ... where ever one goes.

    I am calling on Mr. Gove to look into this. Maybe it might help.
     
  2. Would you agree that there are many qualified teachers who were trained under the British Education System in their mother country, are here, with talents and expertise wasting away, whilst children are struggling with learning in our schools? Let's face it, they would be willing to take less pay just to get a job in the profession they love so dearly. But are barred by the red tapes. Some who have years of teaching experience and second to none training are required to do this and do that to get in, setting them back years in earning power. We are not saying that they should not be vetted, but, all this nonsense were NARIC decides the value of their qualification is insulting and undermining.


    Believe me, I would like some of our teachers here to go to places like Jamaica and see what teacher training is all about. I cannot see how teachers are qualified to teach after one year of training in a country like this. In Jamaica for example, it use to be three years and I was told that it is now four. You might argue that in Britain it is not one year. But I say it is. The degree under normal circumstances takes three years. That degree is more or less theoretical. This is follwed by the almighty PGCE which is a one year course of what? From the first year in a teacher training college in Jamaica there is teaching practice right through. In earlier times trainee teachers had to do a whole year internship before he or she got qualification status and they had better pass that too.


    The next derogatory thing is to ask mature and qualified teachers to have an equivalence in GCSE Maths, English and Science especially if they were trained say in the 70s. These are people who were teaching these subjects for years and moreover they could not dear apply for a place at the teachers colleges, in Jamaica for example, without first passing those subjects in the country's recognised examinations. Maths is Maths, English is English ... where ever one goes.

    I am calling on Mr. Gove to look into this. Maybe it might help.
     

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