1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Overall Migration DOWN!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by sabrinakat, Feb 25, 2016.

  1. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    aspensquiver_2 likes this.
  2. TheRomanReturn

    TheRomanReturn New commenter

    Net migration to the UK was estimated at 323,000 last year (probably much higher) - making a mockery of D.C's claims to get it down to tens of thousands.
     
    Vladimir and finisterre_277 like this.
  3. artboyusa

    artboyusa Star commenter

    There is no asylum crisis. For example, my colleague at the County Council who told me how his department is completely overwhelmed with young unaccompanied asylum seeking kids who they can't place and have exhausted their budget to support and over whom he is at his wit's end was totalling making it all up. Everything is fine.
     
    Vladimir, finisterre_277 and wanet like this.
  4. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    45,000 Bulgarians and Romanians came to the UK for work reasons, an increase of 17,000 on the year to September 2014. About two thirds of them had a definite job to go to

    165,000 EU citizens came to the UK for work-related reasons - 96,000, or 58%, had a definite job to go to and 69,000, or 42%, came looking for work

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-35658731

    These stats that I've pulled from the coverage give me cause for concern, I admit. Speculative admissions to the UK on the basis that people hope to find work.

    There is nothing to prevent me from going to Romania without a job offer. Of course! The same doesn't apply to an idea I might have of toddling off to the US.

    The more I think about free passage of persons throughout Europe the more I wonder quite why it was ever introduced.
     
    wanet and finisterre_277 like this.
  5. jacob

    jacob Lead commenter

    Study is down due to crackdown on all those dodgy "colleges" that brought people in, let them disappear into the populace, and got 5 grand government dosh for each one.
     
    wanet and finisterre_277 like this.
  6. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    If you live in many parts of Europe you may well work in one country, live in another and often shop in a third. Trying to live like that with formal border checks would be onerous, to say the least. Free passage of people for work, leisure or any other reason is a good thing.

    But nobody should be given benefits if they move from one country to another, just because they might be qualified for them had they remained in their home country.
     
    T0nyGT and wanet like this.
  7. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    If we do leave the EU it would cause an issue with the Irish border. but perhaps tjhere is a solution.
     
  8. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    The RATE of migration may be down, but migration numbers are still increasing.

    Overall migration will therefore be UP.
     
    wanet likes this.
  9. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

  10. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    Well, I can quite see the logic on the mainland of Europe. Absolutely. For the reasons given by Frank.

    It's relocation of the home-base that is problematic.

    Nobody is going to object to me working in France (oh, no, the AIR MILES!!!) if there's a job for me and I commute and pay local taxes (if applicable). I can see the logic in living in France and working in Belgium. Absolutely. But migration? Uprooting a whole family?
     
  11. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    Frank has that sorted.
     
  12. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The son d a friend of mine was one of the EU citizens who came here last year looking for work. He cost the UK precisely NOTHING and spent all the money that he brought with him and the extra that his parents sent.
    He stayed for 3 months (with me), went to quite a few interviews but did not secure work. He was not allowed to sign on for JSA.
     
    sabrinakat likes this.
  13. Alf58

    Alf58 Established commenter

    I
    I suppose it depends on if you have the impression you are migrating to the land of milk and honey.
     
  14. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    The 'immigrants' who live near me are never in.and all seem the be working.
    The problem is not 'them' coming and taking jobs.we must need them to be able to employ them. The problem lies in the other areas, such as increasing demand for housing,schools and health.all increasing the lack of such things for others. They do work hard .well the ones I have worked with.and in fact when I have asked British young folk most of them dont want to work. Immigrants do, as its still a good wage for them.
     
  15. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    So that's essentially having a sponsor @jubilee
    That's the common-sense approach.
    If it comes to health-care on the NHS I assume we bill the country of origin.
     

Share This Page