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Original Writing for low ability year 10's - help!!

Discussion in 'English' started by PIGGYSSPECS, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. Hello everyone,
    I've got to put together a SoW for very low ability year 10's on original writing for coursework. I want to start by looking at the features of a story-how to create effective characters, settings, etc.
    Has anyone got any schemes they would be willing to share? Or recommendations for books/extracts? This is my first time teaching year 10 and it's my 2nd PGCE placement so I really want to impress!
    Thanks
    Mx
     
  2. Hello everyone,
    I've got to put together a SoW for very low ability year 10's on original writing for coursework. I want to start by looking at the features of a story-how to create effective characters, settings, etc.
    Has anyone got any schemes they would be willing to share? Or recommendations for books/extracts? This is my first time teaching year 10 and it's my 2nd PGCE placement so I really want to impress!
    Thanks
    Mx
     
  3. Have some stuff on descriptive writing you might find helpful - post up your email address. How low ability are they? If very low, perhaps consider using 'BOY' by Roald Dahl, which I use in some of the lessons I will send you.
     
  4. Thanks Palbam. Most of them aren't expected to pass GCSE, 2 of them are autistic, attention spans pretty low. The school doesn't have any IWB's so I can't rely on the usual things I do to engage!
    email is samlet007@hotmail.com
    Thanks again
    Mx
     
  5. I'm forwarding you some stuff on Fairy Stories.
     
  6. pooky ducky

    pooky ducky New commenter

    Do you have smart board software on your pc?
    Can send you some smart board lesson files I have that are low abilty (much lower than year 10) but you could have a look and adapt some of it.
     
  7. Thanks for the offer Pooky Ducky, but my school only has 1 smartboard and there's zero chance of me getting hold of it, so I'm relying on the good old blackboard!!
     
  8. Fairy tales would be a great opener. Danger is they'll just know Disney, therefore pretty anodyne. Never mind, they are good stories, despite Disney.
    some ideas that might work:
    finishing off a story - getting them to match character etc. An unfamiliar fairy story ? (or they are all unfamiliar to them?)
    telling a story about something that happened to them, and then fictionalising it (new name, third person, making up the bits you've forgotten, making it all happen on one day, etc.). Use a bit of autobiographical ish fiction as stimulus (Roll of Thunder hear my cry?)
    A modern version of a fairy story (so a feminist Cinderella, or Jack the Giant Killer growing a genetically modified beanstalk, etc.) (Angela Carter's book of fairy stories might provide a model?)
    Mini-sagas - a fairy story in 50 words (25? 20?)
    Using a photo or postcard as stimulus. You write the story of which the image is a freeze-frame moment.
    I limit mine to One time setting, one place setting, and a maximum of 3 named characters, and I ban sudden death and explicit sex (though if you explicitly ban the latter you will put ideas into their heads, so don't). (the time place restriction wouldn't work so well for fairy tales, because their essence is they span quite a bit of time.)
    You could try a frame story which would give them structure and also a bit of an audience
    e.g. A babysitter tells a story to the child who won't sleep
    A train breaks down and one of the passengers starts telling the others at his/her table a story.
    An elderly person on a park bench...
    etc.

     
  9. original writing can be really open, so maybe get them to think outside the box.

    Have a creativity lesson, bring in boxes for each table- dependent on behaviour and ability, of postcards, examples of short stories, interesting extracts from newspapers etc

    Write what they know about, summer holidays are always a favourite talking point- really push for them to have confidence in their own voice.

    With one year 10 pupil i got him to write about his sisters wedding, as if he was at the age he attended it, and as if he was on the journey home from it- allowing him to retell it exactly as he told it to me.

    once they get excited about telling "their" stories, i think you'll find they'll produce good bits of work.
     
  10. Thanks everyone for all your fantastic ideas - there's lots of food for thought here and I'll definitely be making use of the resources. Much appreciated!
    Mx
     

  11. This works for all abilties....writing as a survivor on the 'Titanic':

    creating a persona of a real survivor(Internet research)
    studying factual details of ship,accomodation
    the timescale of the ship wreck

    I usually give kids a character card eg. Lady Victoria Plum staying in 1st class on her way to visit her brother, Paddy O'Hare stoker 3td class working on the ship...

    And of COURSE you get to watch the film!!!
    And you can craft /plan the writing...the kids really do excel in this!
     
  12. Sorry to be cheeky but could I have a copy of ideas, SOWs etc as well. I'm in the same situation and struggling!
    clarelouise83@yahoo.co.uk
     
  13. Hope you don't mind me jumping onto topic but have found lots of good suggestions in this thread. I wondered if you could add me to the Sow, comments, ideas email at leehoward.teacher@googlemail.com

    Love to hear any suggestions for my particular Creative Writing course:

    I am a prospective student teacher but am actually writing and delivering an Introduction to Creative Writing Course due to start on March 23rd!

    The group is about 8 people strong and comprised of recent school leavers, unemployed, foreign nationals, poetry enthusiasts and would-be children's authors. So quite a mixed bunch!

    Basically this is very much a introductory course (12 weeks long) and the majority of the students will be of low ability.

    It might help if I point out that this course is part of an overall project based in an economically deprived and multicultural urban environment. So I am really determined that the course outline I am putting together and the 'theme' to be discussed each week be relevant and engaging to the group.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  14. Go for their own stories.
    Start them off by telling them a story or two of your own.
    Then get them to come up and share one or two ideas. Do it orally at first.
    Develop the ideas as a draft.
    Peer read/comment. Set word limits. focus on great opening lines and fantastic titles.
    TES's very own lamented Write Away had lots of good materials. You can find a few online
    https://www.tes.co.uk/search/search_results.aspx?search=wr...
    They focus around an idea - so "A person who means/meant a lot to me" or "When I learned that/how to...." or "The time I nearly..." and so on.
     
  15. Desgined for ks3 and I have used it with my Year 9's. Might work for your Year 10 if they are low ability. Has a whole scheme of work and lesson plans- excellent if you don't have time to plan! But with enough flexibility for you to change and adapt. What I liked was the checklist at the beginning and how at the end of each lesson they can tick off which they've done. Every lesson contributes to the end product beautifully.

    http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/secondary/keystage3/down...
     
  16. My very low ability Y10 class responded really well to the idea of making a puppet show for younger children. We started by telling stories they already knew, and then wrote them as a playscript. Then they used very simple black outline puppets to give ¨voice¨to the dialogue.
    I found that they drafted and rewrote their own words reall well using this stimulus. They were not so inhibited as it was the puppets, not them, who were talking, and they listened to one another and made suggestions about the use of language.
    They did actually perform their puppet shows to Y1 pupils, and it was an extremely succesful project overall.
     

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