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Options with a primary QTS

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by simonlambert, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone,
    This is my first post so I apologise if it is in the wrong area.
    I am a first year student at an excellent university, currently studying for a 3 year B(Ed) Primary Education with QTS.
    I am currently on placement at the moment, just finishing the second week of my first placement. I absolutely love being in front of the class teaching, it is the most rewarding thing I have ever done. The problem I am having, is after a long day of teaching, I come home, and have lesson plans to do, as well as a huge folder full of work that needs to be done as record of QTS standards. I spend almost the whole night sorting lessons out for the next day and then sorting these requirements out, often I only get 4-5 hours sleep per night.
    I have enquired with several teachers about the normal workload for the teacher, and the answer that keeps coming back to me is that yes, there is a lot to do as a student teacher, but as a qualified teacher the workload does not decrease. On the contrary, it can go up, but the work is obviously different.
    I am not work shy but this is too much for me to handle. Two week block placements are fine, I can manage. But I can't see myself doing this as a career. The hours are too long and the workload is too high.
    My question is therefore, with a teaching degree, what other jobs can I go into? I am strong in music, PE, computers and science, and have seen teachers that come into the school from an agency to teach specific subjects, and that appeals to me. How many other careers are there that I could go into, as a teaching degree is very vocational and tailored towards the traditional teacher.
    Thank you in advance for any advice
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    This is my first post so I apologise if it is in the wrong area.
    I am a first year student at an excellent university, currently studying for a 3 year B(Ed) Primary Education with QTS.
    I am currently on placement at the moment, just finishing the second week of my first placement. I absolutely love being in front of the class teaching, it is the most rewarding thing I have ever done. The problem I am having, is after a long day of teaching, I come home, and have lesson plans to do, as well as a huge folder full of work that needs to be done as record of QTS standards. I spend almost the whole night sorting lessons out for the next day and then sorting these requirements out, often I only get 4-5 hours sleep per night.
    I have enquired with several teachers about the normal workload for the teacher, and the answer that keeps coming back to me is that yes, there is a lot to do as a student teacher, but as a qualified teacher the workload does not decrease. On the contrary, it can go up, but the work is obviously different.
    I am not work shy but this is too much for me to handle. Two week block placements are fine, I can manage. But I can't see myself doing this as a career. The hours are too long and the workload is too high.
    My question is therefore, with a teaching degree, what other jobs can I go into? I am strong in music, PE, computers and science, and have seen teachers that come into the school from an agency to teach specific subjects, and that appeals to me. How many other careers are there that I could go into, as a teaching degree is very vocational and tailored towards the traditional teacher.
    Thank you in advance for any advice
     
  3. I appreciate that you are currently under pressure with your workload but encourage you not completely to dismiss a career in teaching at this stage. Teaching can be extremely rewarding.
    You should consider that all teachers are now entitled to focus 10% of their working time on the planning and preparation of lessons and pupil assessment. This is commonly known PPA time. As an NQT you will initially be entitled to 20% PPA time.
    Teachers in modern schools now have fewer administrative duties to undertake. All schools employ support staff which allows teachers to free up their time and energy to focus on teaching.
    Graham Holley
     

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