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Openly critical

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Historial, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. Thanks for all the advice. I took it on board and when a student decided to tell me how bad I was at my job yesterday I invited him into the corridor and asked why he was being so rude. I aslo told him he was disruptive and any further comments would not be tolerated.
    Today I got pulled up by my HOD as his father had called in to complain about me upsetting his son!
    I am looking to leave this school as soon as possible but sadly my supply is until the end of the year :(
     
  2. 'I invited him into the corridor and asked why he was being so rude. I aslo told him he was disruptive and any further comments would not be tolerated.
    Today I got pulled up by my HOD as his father had called in to complain about me upsetting his son!'
    Speechless.
     
  3. Oh my gosh! Seriously??? And the HOD was on the boy's side?
    That is the most ridiculous thing I have heard today.
    You've made me feel very lucky that I'm in a school where I am supported. How annoying!! Did you speak to him in a polite and respectful manner? (Very hard when they're being so nasty though!)
    it could be that the boy lied to his parents about what happened. The other day a boy said, "this woman is so dopey" about me. I sent him out. He immediately told his parents that I'd sent him out for no reason. They complained about me to his head of year. then when I put him in detention the next day, the boy went to his head of year and wriggled out of my detention. How annoying!!
    Surely what the boy was doing was against school rules. (Surely??) I can see no possible reason why your HOD would prefer you to let this kind of behaviour go unchallenged. Did he/she have any suggestions for what you should have dnoe?
     
  4. "alie!" i think the kids would say
     
  5. Well my HOD just said we couldn't put him in detention for the original comments (which was what I'd wanted to do) as it would anger the parents and cause a whole issue. Sometimes we have to let things go.
    I feel I'll never get anywhere in this school because my students can and do say whatever they like to me!
     
  6. ' I can see no possible reason why your HOD would prefer you to let this kind of behaviour go unchallenged'
    ' Well my HOD just said we couldn't put him in detention for the original comments (which was what I'd wanted to do) as it would anger the parents and cause a whole issue'

     
  7. sparklyeyes

    sparklyeyes New commenter

    Oh my goodness, what you (OP) are describing is exactly what used to happen in a school I worked at for a year in Manchester. I would love to know what school you are at, oh the coincidence if it was one and the same! Inbox me?

    And I wanted to say, if you are supply you do not have to stay at all, even if you have made a verbal agreement. Did you get the job through an agency - I would guess yes seeing as you are supply - if it is a really difficult school, they would fully understand your reasons i you asked them now to find you something else for Easter. I would seriously consider it, the only reason I stayed at the school under those circumstances was because I was on a contract.
     
  8. Awful. That's shocking but I'm no longer surprised after reading your previous posts. I'm no expert at all but I'd get out if I were you. Take comfort in the knowledge that it is NOT like that in all schools. No wonder the school is so challenging if this is the kind of behaviour system that is in place.
     
  9. shame on any parents who actually support their little darlings going into school and treating teachers in such an appalling manner.
     
  10. And on the Managers who are afraid to deal with the issue.
     
  11. OP: please do not take this as being critical of you. Anyone who has read this thread knows you to be an honest and concerned teacher who wants to do well in the profession you have chosen.
    But...
    Supply teaching is not easy. I'm a Head now but six years ago I was on supply for a year. Some or all of these points tend to be true of supply teachers. They have a shadowy existence. Teachers tend not to know or be interested in them. They come and go without being obliged, or at times even invited, to attend staff or departmental meetings or PD events. Supply teachers have their own little area in the staff room. Supply teachers don't get invited to staff functions. They don't get proper induction into school policies and procedures, particularly though not exclusively, in the area of behaviour management.
    Teachers tend to be suspicious of supply teachers, assuming they are here today, and sooner or later when they stuff up they will be gone tomorrow, and the permanent staff will be left to clear up the mess. Leaders are equally suspicious. Long term supply teachers rarely get taken on permanently. For some reason it is "better the devil you don't know."
    Children are aware that supply teachers come and go, so they have internalized negativity. They tend to expect supply teachers to be temporary and they too assume supply teachers are useless, and they respond accordingly. Teenagers in particular are certainly not prepared to invest emotionally in someone who might not be there the next day.
    And so the mud stucks. As each incident happens, firmly held stereotypical beliefs are reinforced. The HOD, faced with children and parents who will be there a lot longer than a supply teacher who might one day just decide not to turn up, attempts to avoid "issues." S/he probably understands that to make an issue of this incident may well lead to a deluge of complaints about this supply teacher who "everyone knows, even the kids" doesn't even have the basic skills to control a class. Appraisal would be a waste of time, because once the supply term has been completed the supply teacher will be out of the school for good, so the HOD, who can hardly discipline someone who isn't even a full member of staff, contains the problem as best s/he can.
    You see where this is going? You need to get noticed in a positive way. I suggest you have a heart to heart with your HOD. You need to find out not only what inspired the decision not to punish the child, but also where you stand in the department and the school. As you are hoping to be there until the end of summer term, in as nice a way as you can, ask to be treated as a full member of staff. Find out, if you don't already know, what the prospects are for a permanent post. Ask for appraisal. From what I have suggested above, you can expect criticism, particularly of your classroom management and possibly of your relationships with children. However unfair they may be, and however much you believe they are motivated by a lack of knowledge of you and your skills, accept the criticism with good grace and undertake to move forward, with the support of the department, the HOD and the management.
    Good luck
     
  12. desertpirate"
    .... supply teachers..... have a shadowy existence. Teachers tend not to know or be interested in them. They come and go without being obliged, or at times even invited, to attend staff or departmental meetings or PD events. Supply teachers have their own little area in the staff room. Supply teachers don't get invited to staff functions. They don't get proper induction into school policies and procedures, particularly though not exclusively, in the area of behaviour management.
    Teachers tend to be suspicious of supply teachers, assuming they are here today, and sooner or later when they stuff up they will be gone tomorrow, and the permanent staff will be left to clear up the mess. Leaders are equally suspicious. Long term supply teachers rarely get taken on permanently. For some reason it is "better the devil you don't know."

    Well, those are all good reasons for school managers to change their policy towards supply teachers, but:

    Children are aware that supply teachers come and go, so they have internalized negativity. They tend to expect supply teachers to be temporary and they too assume supply teachers are useless, and they respond accordingly. Teenagers in particular are certainly not prepared to invest emotionally in someone who might not be there the next day.

    Where did they get the example of negativity? Doesn't say much for their role models, does it. And who's asking them to 'invest emotionally' ? All a supply teacher, or indeed any teacher, needs from them is BASIC HUMAN RESPECT.

    And so the mud stucks. As each incident happens, firmly held stereotypical beliefs are reinforced. The HOD, faced with children and parents who will be there a lot longer than a supply teacher who might one day just decide not to turn up, attempts to avoid "issues." S/he probably understands that to make an issue of this incident may well lead to a deluge of complaints about this supply teacher who "everyone knows, even the kids" doesn't even have the basic skills to control a class. Appraisal would be a waste of time, because once the supply term has been completed the supply teacher will be out of the school for good, so the HOD, who can hardly discipline someone who isn't even a full member of staff, contains the problem as best s/he can.

    Again, none of this would happen /matter in an environment where the most basic rules of civilized behaviour were in place. 'Containing the problem' is just another way of saying: 'blame-the-victim', or 'ignore-it-and-it'll-go-away'. Unfortunately, it doesn't. As you pointed out, ignoring the problem just reinforces the stereotypes.... and we aren't allowed to stereotype kids, now are we. So why is it being passed off as acceptable to do it to teachers?

    .... You need to find out not only what inspired the decision not to punish the child, but also where you stand in the department and the school....

    That seems fairly clear from the situation the poster is writing about.

    Find out, if you don't already know, what the prospects are for a permanent post. Ask for appraisal.

    What's the point, if, as you said yourself, schools rarely appoint even long-term supply teachers, and there isn't much point in appraisal, as supply teachers are expected to move on.

    From what I have suggested above, you can expect criticism, particularly of your classroom management and possibly of your relationships with children. However unfair they may be, and however much you believe they are motivated by a lack of knowledge of you and your skills, accept the criticism with good grace and undertake to move forward, with the support of the department, the HOD and the management.

    Right. And don't forget to say: 'Two bags full. Sir'.
     

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