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one child in the class

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Cupsy, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. Cupsy

    Cupsy New commenter

    Hi. I've recently moved schools into a 2 form entry primary. I have a boy in my class, year 4, who is very disruptive - shouting out, throwing things at the other children, calling them names such as `'dick" if they get an answer incorrect in class, banging on the table etc. I don't have any TA support in class and am finding managing this behaviour really challenging. I have tried being really positive with him, giving him dojos for making good choices, following instructions, listening carefully and so on. I've tried ignoring him but his behaviour gets worse and worse until he is spoken to.
    I am following the school's behaviour policy but he will refuse to go into time to think. I have to send another child to fetch a member of senior management who will remove him from class. He will then come back into class and be generally calm for the next hour or so. I tried using a behaviour chart with him as an incentive, whereby if he remained on task and didn't distract others he could have some time at the end of the day with the TA from the other year group class to do a chosen activity. This was really working with him and his behaviour improved. However, the TA complained to senior management that she was not happy to do this, they spoke to me and said there was no one else available, so I have been unable to continue with his chart.
    I am finding his behaviour really hard work, its really disrupting teaching the class as I have to keep stopping to remind him of rules and he will shout over me. Senior management have said this is all attention seeking and he likes the one to one time he has with them when he is sent out. They have advised I try and keep him in class as much as possible and find strategies to include him. I have also spoken to the SENCO who said I need to keep on building a relationship with him and things will improve.
    Has anyone got any ideas please?
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  2. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Is there anything going on at home that would make him act this way to seek attention?
     
  3. Cupsy

    Cupsy New commenter

    Hi. I've spoken with his parents several times, they are lovely and really supportive. They say he is even worse at home, his language is terrible and he can be violent towards them and his younger siblings. I asked what strategies they used at home with him and they said they struggle but he will calm down if they send him to his room to watch television for a bit. I've spoke with his previous class teacher too. He said that last year his TA would take the child out of the room and calm him down with a chat and bring him back when he was ready to learn. I don't have any support this year though so finding this a real challenge.
     
  4. GladRagsAtMidnight2017

    GladRagsAtMidnight2017 Occasional commenter

    A thought - would you consider that you keep him back for 10 mins at lunchtime and do something special with him? He is seeking that approval and attention as you say, and something like that 10mins may just help and you could also get to know him a bit better and find out his likes/dislikes etc.
     
  5. TEA2111

    TEA2111 Established commenter

    My two pennies worth: I agree with senior management: "all attention seeking and he likes the one to one time he has with them when he is sent out." (he knows what he wants and he knows how to manipulate people to get what he wants) However, their advice " try and keep him in class as much as possible and find strategies to include him".... is unfair on you and on the other learners. A strategy should be in place with very clear consequences: SMT/SENCO must remove the child when he is disruptive, but with consequences that send out a stern message that his behaviour will not get what he wants. To be effective, SMT/SENCO must be consistent, and then hopefully the incidences of removing from the classroom should lessen.
    "I have also spoken to the SENCO who said I need to keep on building a relationship with him and things will improve"....to me is a cop out, and it seems he/she does not want to be bothered with dealing with this child. Easier to let the class teacher deal with the problem.
    I do not understand (and I see this at my school) why badly behaved children get 'rewarded/ special treatment' over the other children who tow the line. I feel for you; I'm dealing with a similar problem as many other teachers are.
     

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