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One Born Every Minute USA

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by DollyD, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. As a huge fan of the UK version I've just watched this for the first time and I'm actually quite angry and traumatised by the whole thing lol. It has really riled me for the following reasons:
    1) women come in, lie pretty much flat on their backs. Everything we're told not to do here in the UK with a normal labour.
    2) epidurals are given as pretty much a matter of course.
    3) as soon as the woman makes ANY noise the 'nurses' (note nurses not midwives) go into a panic and demand more drugs for the poor woman.
    4) like noise, pain is not accepted and as soon as the woman complains of pain then she's dosed up again.
    5) choice quotes like 'if you move it'll hurt more', 'we'll let gravity help....lets sit you up' and 'after 8 hours of labour the nurses are becoming concerned...'. Excuse me?? 8 hours? that's a walk in the park for a first labour.
    To me this is horribly medically controlled, to the point of being sinister; giving no autonomy to the labouring mother who should be able to go with what her body's telling her. By all means offer an epidural but not just as a means of getting the woman to shut up! At the end of the day childbirth is a natural process but as far as I can see the mainstream US systme turns it into a intervention led nightmare. I can't bear to watch any more!!
    Anyone else had the same reaction or is this just me?!!

    DD
    (19+6)
    xx

     
  2. As a huge fan of the UK version I've just watched this for the first time and I'm actually quite angry and traumatised by the whole thing lol. It has really riled me for the following reasons:
    1) women come in, lie pretty much flat on their backs. Everything we're told not to do here in the UK with a normal labour.
    2) epidurals are given as pretty much a matter of course.
    3) as soon as the woman makes ANY noise the 'nurses' (note nurses not midwives) go into a panic and demand more drugs for the poor woman.
    4) like noise, pain is not accepted and as soon as the woman complains of pain then she's dosed up again.
    5) choice quotes like 'if you move it'll hurt more', 'we'll let gravity help....lets sit you up' and 'after 8 hours of labour the nurses are becoming concerned...'. Excuse me?? 8 hours? that's a walk in the park for a first labour.
    To me this is horribly medically controlled, to the point of being sinister; giving no autonomy to the labouring mother who should be able to go with what her body's telling her. By all means offer an epidural but not just as a means of getting the woman to shut up! At the end of the day childbirth is a natural process but as far as I can see the mainstream US systme turns it into a intervention led nightmare. I can't bear to watch any more!!
    Anyone else had the same reaction or is this just me?!!

    DD
    (19+6)
    xx

     
  3. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    I haven't seen it, but have heard about it and people have said pretty much the same as what you have, about the big difference between the US and the UK.
    I expect some of it is about money? I suppose procedures like epidurals cost and they can make money from it! My sister lives in China and says there they encourage c-sections as they're expensive! After interventions when you give birth you usually end up staying in hospital longer too.
    My first labour was just over 8 hours from first twinge to giving birth! My 2nd was just under 4.5 hours, but I was induced. I was lucky i had both using just TENS and gas and air, but i imagine if i'd been in the US i'd have been drugged up to the eyeballs! Even when I was induced, they hardly checked on me, just let me get on with it! I was home the same day after my 2nd, which i doubt i'd have been able to do if i'd had en epidural.
    I think interventions are great if you have a really long labour, and clearly if the baby is in danger, but like you say childbirth is a natural thing.

     
  4. I agree - it is so different from the UK version - I still can't help watching it though! They keep on saying things like 'you wouldn't go to the dentist and not have any pain relief'! And I hate the way all the nurses in the corridors look shocked if they hear any noise coming from the rooms..
     
  5. I also find it bizarre how they often have a ton of people in the delivery room with them throughout. One had aunts and nieces and another had about 10 people including her father in law in there through the whole of the pushing phase!
     
  6. I agree, I've got bored with it and stopped watching. And also - is it me or do they all end up with giant babies over there?? The UK version is much more entertaining and informative I think.
     
  7. Omg can you imagine your in laws there while you push? That's just weird. And I hate that keeping the women quiet thing. In childbirth you make heaps of noise. Get over it!
     
  8. I haven't seen it but I have watched programmes on sky home and health that are exactly as you describe in post 1 Dolly- I had also thought that ladies in the US get epidurals as a matter of course when we are encouraged not to. I guess Chica (was it Chica?) is right and it's a matter of money- epidurals are probably expensive and they are paying for their healthcare. Maybe i won't watch it now! When's the UK one coming back?!
     
  9. Oh and on the sky programmes they have tons of family in there too- or waiting in the waiting room- very strange!!
     
  10. It's just awful!
    I'm watching it now on More4.
     
  11. Think UK one is aired around jan/feb time. Aaaaaaaaaaaaaages to wait. Although there is One Born at Christmas too........which'll be blatantly be me - having to be pushing out bub while everyone else is enjoying turkey and chrimbo pud lol
     
  12. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    I did want a nat birth, and do agree with it as some women do birth easily, with no pain BUT let's be honest, a quarter of women in my hometown have emergency CS, as in not through choice. If we just let nature have it's way, at least 50 of the mothers and babies I know well would have died. And we have a far higher rate of post traumatic stress disorder then the USA. WOmen in our hospitals are routinely left without support/pain relief even if they want it. And in my case, it was pushed on me even though I didn't want any. It's probably cos they pay, but American women are amazed by our third world maternity service-in some cases.
    When I went into labour, women were made to deliver in the day room and kitchen as there were no rooms left. My son nearly died as they were so busy they ignored my midwife-who was dealing with 5 women-screaming at them to organise an emergency CS. I know this isn't everyone's experience, I was amazed when I asked on here to find many women had one to one midwife care in the UK. But maybe they live in richer areas?
    Neither system is ideal. Obviously if a woman can and wants to give birth naturally, she should. But I'd rather have the American system in our hospitals than have anyone else go through what we did-and I was one of the lucky ones. My son lived.
    Interestingly enough, two of the experts I talked to on the postnatal ward reckon that most births will have to be CS in 100years time, due to relative size of baby heads!
     
  13. Not sure who asked, but UK version is due March/April. They're filming at my hospital in Leeds when I'm due!
    X
     
  14. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    A friend of mine who is from India did say that our hospital, the same one I delivered in, is far more 'third world' than some of the so called 'third world' places she has had her children (she's been to a lot of places and has 6 kids so I guess knows quite a bit!) I am not saying all of this to worry people, as I say there are tons of positive stories and I'm sure fabulouus UK maternity wards, but I feel it's important to warn first time mums who think everything should be great and natural that there are maybe reasons why America does it like that. I wish someone had warned me what could happen in our wards.Or day rooms. Or kitchens.
     
  15. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    hhhh you must've had a really negative experience, which is really a shame, but not all hospitals are like that. I have nothing but praise for the hospital where i had both my children, and i had really positive experiences both times.
    In fact, i know more women who've had good experiences than bad ones so I don't see a reason for women not to attempt a natural birth if they want to.
     

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