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On supply for a week - behaviour help requested!

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Ronson, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. Ronson

    Ronson New commenter

    I'm currently working at a school for a week, in a KS2 class, and the behaviour's not particularly great. I looked through the notes left by the supply teacher who took them last week and she echoed what I found. Which is that there are several pupils who are particularly difficult - three of them have special behaviour sheets - and the class themselves are generally difficult. I was able to keep the kids on task mostly, but I found that the class as a whole is quite hard to get to attention and keep quiet, as there's a fair bit of chatter. I went in tough, or so I thought, and used both praise and warnings. However, I still found keeping their attention a real struggle. I also took time off lunch/break for the class not coming to attention, even after being given enough time. I was pretty reluctant to do this as I felt I was penalizing the whole class, but given it wasn't just one or two offenders this seemed like the only option. Has anyone got any tips as to what I can do to better bring the class to attention and keep them from shouting out all the time?
     
  2. Ronson

    Ronson New commenter

    I'm currently working at a school for a week, in a KS2 class, and the behaviour's not particularly great. I looked through the notes left by the supply teacher who took them last week and she echoed what I found. Which is that there are several pupils who are particularly difficult - three of them have special behaviour sheets - and the class themselves are generally difficult. I was able to keep the kids on task mostly, but I found that the class as a whole is quite hard to get to attention and keep quiet, as there's a fair bit of chatter. I went in tough, or so I thought, and used both praise and warnings. However, I still found keeping their attention a real struggle. I also took time off lunch/break for the class not coming to attention, even after being given enough time. I was pretty reluctant to do this as I felt I was penalizing the whole class, but given it wasn't just one or two offenders this seemed like the only option. Has anyone got any tips as to what I can do to better bring the class to attention and keep them from shouting out all the time?
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    This is so much the nature of supply. It takes a while to really show a class your expected acceptable levels of behaviour and that means consistency over a period of time- so often a luxury us supplies don't have! Even a week is barley enough to achieve what one would like.
    You have to learn to 'go with the flow' and accept things, which one never would as a permanent teacher. Ignore what you can (selective deafness/blindness can do wonders)! get you behaviour chart started at the start of the lesson/day and keep it updated so only the 'ones who <u>do</u> try it on' have to be punished. Make sure alongside that, you use lots of praise and re-inforcement of good behaviour.
    As to your voice-try not to shout. Standing obviously waiting/ looking at your watch noting every 30 secs/1 min on the board etc. (You can make your 'timings' as long or short as you wish if the children aren't too good with time.) Sometimes talking very softly so children have to strain to hear can be quite effective - no good if they're yelling their heads off obviously!
    Hope those pointers help.
     
  4. You have to do the very difficult balancing act of being a really hard bas tard and getting them to like your teaching style..
    It might not work for everyone but I have the ability to remember every story I've heard and to retell them.( I also make up a few). You use the stories as a reward, "I'll do a story at the end of the morning," you tell them. You keep your promise but if there was any misbehaviour you make it clear that any future story is dependent on them being good. "I was thinking of one about the devil, a witch or when I was on my planet, at home time, if..."
    It's about you setting a routine and something to look forward to..The trick is to know the stories. reading from a book doesn't work.
     
  5. VelvetChalk

    VelvetChalk New commenter

    I use brain gym (For older ones I do rock star poses etc) and one hand up to get back attention and listening, I also do countdowns for attention/coming to carpet and praise a table who is listening and the rest follow.

    I also do a raffle for good behaviour, I have a small bag of prizes (pencils, gel pens) and explain that good behaviour gets a raffle ticket (then name is written on back) to win a prize, the more you get, the more chance etc. When I start this scheme off I give raffle tickets by the bucketload so theres a big incentive.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    What's the school behaviour policy? Make full use of it and make an example of those who do not follow it. Consequences have to be understood. Ensure those who do follow it also benefit from any reward system.
     
  7. school behaviour policy usually only work if you know the kids name. It's extremely difficult otherwise
    'write on the board the kids who misbehave' I am told. how do i know their names without a class list or TA. children never will tell you their name if they are mishaving.[​IMG]
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    This is a KS2 class. If a child refuses to tell you their name, send them to the Head / SMT. If they lie - well the other children will happily tell you.
    These are 7 to 11 year olds, not criminals who refuse to answer questions.
    And you'll soon learn the names of the miscreants quickly. They make themselves known
     
  9. crusell

    crusell New commenter

    Haven't the school provided you with a class photo sheet?
     
  10. Ronson

    Ronson New commenter

    No - though I did learn their names by the time my time as the school was finished! Thanks for your advice, folks. In the end, I just kept plugging away at it. It got fractionally easier, but it was still a struggle. I felt better supported at the school than i did at the last school where I did a week long placement. As advised by the staff, I sent a few of the regular offenders out when they got very disruptive. They'd usually come back in and say sorry, then do the same thing the day after!

    The school actually asked me back for a bit longer as well, which I took - partly because I wanted the money and partly because I felt the experience of dealing with the class would benefit me. So I must have been doing something right. I feel more confident having done this - though if they'd asked me to do it for a whole month I probably wouldn't have agreed.
     

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