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Oh right, so it's all the teachers' fault then?

Discussion in 'Education news' started by monicabilongame, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    @bombaysapphire

    Resonates well with me. Idiots like this guy don't even seem to understand the implications of what they are saying.

    The vast majority of teachers expect too much of themselves. They aspire to unrealistic goals. They always fall short – and deep down they realise that they do. They know there is always more they can do for their pupils. They know that what they and their schools provide can never be good enough for the young people in their care. They acknowledge that their schools can never be perfect. Inevitably, they feel guilty about their shortcomings when they fail to meet unrealistic aspirations.

    ''And we here at Ofsted take full advantage of that.''
     
  2. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    That last line could be changed to "Inevitably they become ill."
     
    needabreak likes this.
  3. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    ...and now desperately trying to deflect the blame onto - errr... I wonder... Oh, I know! it's the teachers fault, not ours!
     
    needabreak and lanokia like this.
  4. snowyhead

    snowyhead Lead commenter

    Read it and wondered what exactly it is he trying to say.
     
  5. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Ofsted have created all of this.

    Whether they want to see certain things or not anymore is now irrelevant. It is too late. They have been responsible for making a monster out of the education system that is consuming way too many decent people on a foundation of dodgy data, poor statistics, insane and non evidence-based marking policies, subjective observations and judgements and a widespread misuse of capability by management who are not fit for purpose.

    This is just another example of the Ofsted/DFES axis steadfastly refusing to see, acknowledge and accept what everyone else is fully aware of
     
    Lalad and NQT1986 like this.
  6. snowyhead

    snowyhead Lead commenter

    @Scintillant your reference to the Ofsted/DfE axis of power is pretty much spot on.
     
    Scintillant likes this.
  7. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Ofsted are the primary cause of education standards in this country declining since their creation. Sure, other factors play a role, political interference, the NC, league tables etc. But Ofsted are the PRINCIPLE FACTOR. [shouty shouty mcginty]

    Scrap Ofsted.
     
    drek and NQT1986 like this.
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I've been fulminating on this article all day since I read it - largely because I'm utterly astonished at the sheer audacity of the man, blaming teachers for 'wanting to be good all the time'. I can recall a time, before Ofsted, performance tables, etc, when teachers aspired to be the best they could, but it was understood that sometimes - with the best will in the world, but for a range of reasons - you might not be.

    Now, however, thanks to Ofsted and its judgmental process (which clearly and absolutely demands that teachers be good or better, otherwise the school is damned), there's no room for illness, personal problems, plain old tiredness - or the simple fact that some lessons just don't work out the way you hoped they would.

    And here's this character, telling teachers it's their own faults!
     
    Dragonlady30 and NQT1986 like this.
  9. Yoda-

    Yoda- Lead commenter

    "The problem is that most teachers, quite rightly, are dreamers. " (according to the article).

    Dream on...

    “Control, control, you must learn control!” Yoda
     
  10. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    That's the thing Yoda... they hide behind the hyperbole of teaching, that it's a vocation, that it isn't about the money, that we are all dreamers... so they can justify their ill thought out claptrap.
     
  11. Yoda-

    Yoda- Lead commenter

    “Urm. Put a shield on my saber I must”

    Doctors very often claim a sense of vocation and this has not harmed them in the past as it has teachers. I wonder if the Health Secretary RtHon Jeremy Hunt MP will change this though with his mishandling of the Junior Doctor situation....
     
    drek and monicabilongame like this.
  12. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    The only people I ever heard say things like that in 25 years were always those who were on the biggest salaries in the school and did the smallest amount of teaching, with the odd "I really miss not spending more time in the classroom" thrown in - yeh, right, so why do you get yourself covered all the time to do things that could be done after school?
     
  13. Yoda-

    Yoda- Lead commenter

    It is easy to take the moral high ground if you're standing on a pile of cash.

    “Mudhole? Slimy? My home this is! “ Yoda
     
  14. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    It has a whiff of "lighthouse teachers" about it. You know, teaching would be great if it wasn't for all these teachers.
     
    Middlemarch likes this.
  15. cherryaimless

    cherryaimless New commenter

    I'm saying "NO" a lot more this academic year. I have promised myself that I will leave school (and stop working) at 5.30 every day. So far, except for one day, I have kept that promise.

    The school is still standing, and no-one has died. I have unfinished tasks to do, but unless someone comes and puts a gun to my head, I shan't worry too much about them yet...
     
  16. Yoda-

    Yoda- Lead commenter

    download-1.jpg

    Don't be a dreamer. The original poster say's teachers are dreamers and that's the problem. Use one of these....
     
  17. Lalad

    Lalad Star commenter

    "The problem is that most teachers, quite rightly, are dreamers. They have dreams, aspirations and ideals that can never be fully realised in this imperfect world. For example, they want to do the best by their pupils, but what constitutes “best” and would they ever know if it were achieved? They want to help each pupil meet their potential, but what if the notion of “potential” is meaningless and how can anyone know when it has been met? Teachers want to give their pupils fulfilling lives, yet they are only one influence among many, and is it appropriate to place any single notion of “fulfilment” on others with different life experiences?

    Teachers want their teaching to be never less than good, but what does that mean and can it realistically be achieved in every single lesson? They want to intervene with optimum effect to develop pupils’ knowledge, but with the best will in the world – and even with all the time in the world – can teachers ever truly get close to understanding their pupils’ minds? And even if they could, how would they know their influence had been optimal?

    The vast majority of teachers expect too much of themselves. They aspire to unrealistic goals. They always fall short – and deep down they realise that they do. They know there is always more they can do for their pupils. They know that what they and their schools provide can never be good enough for the young people in their care. They acknowledge that their schools can never be perfect. Inevitably, they feel guilty about their shortcomings when they fail to meet unrealistic aspirations.

    Consciously or unconsciously, they try to assuage their guilt through hard work and long hours. And they succeed, at least to a limited extent, but at a vast cost to themselves."


    Ok.

    I will accept that I have dreams, aspirations and ideals that can never be fully realised in this imperfect world. I will accept that I want to do my best for my pupils, and that I want to help each child reach their potential. And yes, I do want to give my pupils fulfilling lives, whatever their different life experiences.

    It would be great if my teaching were never less than good, and like every teacher, I am well aware that it can't realistically be achieved in every single lesson. Unfortunately, the expectation now in many schools is that 80% of lessons should be 'good', and the other 20% 'outstanding'. Last year, teachers in my LA who were graded 'good', were sent on courses on how to be outstanding, while those who were already considered outstanding were sent - I kid you not - on a course called 'Beyond outstanding'. You couldn't make it up.

    No, we do not expect too much of ourselves - too much is expected of us by others. We don't aspire to unrealistic goals - the goalposts are constantly being moved. The suggestion that the 'vast majority of teachers...always fall short' is deeply insulting, as is the assertion that we feel 'guilty about our shortcomings' when we 'fail' to meet these unrealistic aspirations - the reality is that it is the relentless piling on of more and more unrealistic expectations of teachers that is driving this profession to the wall.

    Hard work and long hours are not an attempt to assuage guilt - they have become the expectation.
    Of course we know that there is always more that we can do for our pupils, and we try our hardest to ensure that what we, and our schools, provide is good enough - but we cannot do that if we are exhausted, overworked, constantly monitored, hounded and targeted for being anything less than perfect ourselves.

    We have entered the perfect storm of experienced teachers being pushed out, rising pupil numbers, shortages in many subjects and areas, a new curriculum, and unrealistic expectations, not only of existing teachers but also of NQTs, many of whom are voting with their feet and leaving a profession they have only just joined.

    For the sake of the children, just let us do what we do best and have been trained for: teach.
     
    needabreak and RedQuilt like this.
  18. mrayandandlovu

    mrayandandlovu New commenter

    Well he would say that, wouldn't he?
     
    needabreak and lanokia like this.
  19. irs1054

    irs1054 Star commenter

    A completely classic case of victim blaming.

    When people outside of teaching but associated with education have as little attachment to reality as this person seems to have, then there is little hope.

    The system is broken.
     
    RedQuilt and lanokia like this.
  20. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    claps loudly to that comment:)
     

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