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Ofsted

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by dylan83, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. I was told this week that Ofsted will deem a lesson unsatisfactory if as few as 2 out of 30 children are not fully engaged in a lesson - e.g. swinging on their chair or talking.
    How in the world can you ensure that *every* child is engaged, for the entire lesson, when you're teaching children who are constantly on report, in trouble with every teacher, having regular detentions from Heads of Year, etc. Some children just do not want to learn, and if you've been unable to hook them into your subject, even the most exciting, engaging lesson will be pointless - if only because they'll take things too far and use it as an excuse to show off and be silly.
    Can Ofsted really be this petty?
     
  2. I was told this week that Ofsted will deem a lesson unsatisfactory if as few as 2 out of 30 children are not fully engaged in a lesson - e.g. swinging on their chair or talking.
    How in the world can you ensure that *every* child is engaged, for the entire lesson, when you're teaching children who are constantly on report, in trouble with every teacher, having regular detentions from Heads of Year, etc. Some children just do not want to learn, and if you've been unable to hook them into your subject, even the most exciting, engaging lesson will be pointless - if only because they'll take things too far and use it as an excuse to show off and be silly.
    Can Ofsted really be this petty?
     
  3. This is a complete and utter fairy story. Whoever told you this is completely ignorant of the inspection framework and the evaluation schedule that Ofsted use.
    Ofsted don't grade the overall quality of lessons. They stopped doing this in 2009. Instead you get grades for : learning and progress, behaviour, quality of teaching and learning, assessment to support learning. There might also be grades for care guidance and support and attainment if the inspector has enough evidence. It is true that if the inspector grades behaviour as inadequate, then progress will probably also be inadequate. The criteria for inadequate behaviour is below. As you can see, no mention is made of 2 out of 30. However, if the learning of the other pupils is adversely affected by the bad behaviour of a minority, then the learning and progress might tip into inadequate.







    p


    <table cellpadding="7" cellspacing="0">

    <tr>
    <td>
    • Pupils&rsquo;
      poor behaviour and rudeness occur more frequently than on very
      isolated occasions and inhibit progress in lessons or well-being
      on more than isolated occasions.</font>


    • Time
      is wasted through persistent low-level disruption, excessive
      off-task chatter and a lack of attention in too many lessons.</font>


    • Some
      pupils show a lack of respect for &ndash; or direct challenge to ??
      adults or other young people, including instances of racist or
      sexist behaviour and other forms of bullying.</font>
    </td>
    </tr>
    </table>
     
  4. OK that didn't paste too well. Get the whole thing at http://bit.ly/4ctJcH
     
  5. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Yep, I concur, this is total rubbish. Ofsted are many things, but this isn't one of them, and they certainly don't have anything like a maximum number of pupils misbehaving to qualify for an unsatisfactory. Isn't it odd how rumours like this start? To be fair, it doesn't help that even a thorough trawl of the Ofsted site doesn't offer anything like clear advice to the classroom practitioner.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     

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