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OFSTED - Do as I say, not as I do?? Watch this and weep?

Discussion in 'Ofsted inspections' started by exScites, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. A presentation of the changes to OFSTED given by OFSTED obviously using their new criteria on what is outstanding. the new criteria are in "quote marks"

    http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/introduction-new-school-inspection-framework-summary-of-main-changes

    You can see the audience is "engaged, enthused and motivated" There is evidence of effective and creative use of new technologies - Oh it's a powerpoint. Surely he's not going to read it to me? ....... Oh he is..... (zzzzzz)

    "They build on consistently accurate assessment of pupils? learning needs and plan astutely to ensure that teaching is very well matched to individual needs." So an audience of sophisticated high achievers - Best to read a powerpoint to them!

    "Teachers are very knowledgeable in their subjects and areas of learning and highly effective in teaching them." - The average powerpoint slide has 40 words on it - reading them has been found to be 4% efficient as a means of transmitting information - Pictures/charts etc are 70% +

    "No time is wasted and every opportunity is taken to develop crucial skills such as reading across the curriculum." How long could you deliver that information in?

    How would your loopy year 9s react to him delivering a session on a wet and windy Friday afternoon?

    Should we all adopt this as a model for our lessons citing this as an example from the very top?

    Judge not lest thee be judged colleagues!!Oh go on then comments please
     
  2. A presentation of the changes to OFSTED given by OFSTED obviously using their new criteria on what is outstanding. the new criteria are in "quote marks"

    http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/introduction-new-school-inspection-framework-summary-of-main-changes

    You can see the audience is "engaged, enthused and motivated" There is evidence of effective and creative use of new technologies - Oh it's a powerpoint. Surely he's not going to read it to me? ....... Oh he is..... (zzzzzz)

    "They build on consistently accurate assessment of pupils? learning needs and plan astutely to ensure that teaching is very well matched to individual needs." So an audience of sophisticated high achievers - Best to read a powerpoint to them!

    "Teachers are very knowledgeable in their subjects and areas of learning and highly effective in teaching them." - The average powerpoint slide has 40 words on it - reading them has been found to be 4% efficient as a means of transmitting information - Pictures/charts etc are 70% +

    "No time is wasted and every opportunity is taken to develop crucial skills such as reading across the curriculum." How long could you deliver that information in?

    How would your loopy year 9s react to him delivering a session on a wet and windy Friday afternoon?

    Should we all adopt this as a model for our lessons citing this as an example from the very top?

    Judge not lest thee be judged colleagues!!Oh go on then comments please
     
  3. wigy

    wigy New commenter

    Equally bad .How does student improve if they are not helped to understand the error.

    zinzan. This looks like another wind up
     
  4. Teacher is not student. Who by the way are The School Action Group?
     
  5. It sounds like this School Action Group you're talking about is a local authority thing to help the school out of special measures. I can't understand therefore why they didn't give you detailed feedback and advice on how to improve, since, as you say this is really the only way to bring about improvements in the quality of teaching and learning.
    Now, with Ofsted it's a different story because their code of practice does not allow them to give advice. In my opinion, this should change because many inspectors want to and are able to give very good quality feedback but are prevented from doing so. This argument is more valid now that local authorities don't provide the support they used to. The Australian model of school inspections is a bit like that. Inspectors are tied to one school for a period of time and give feedback to teachers regularly and are able to give advice.
     
  6. Correct and well put
     
  7. Looks like that's changed in the new schedule, so SLT should make sure that they and teachers get that feedback.
    (Sorry robby64 - don't know why the quote is appearing so many times - can't get rid of them)














    "The key objectives of lesson observations are to evaluate the quality of learning and the contribution of teaching. In addition, lesson observations will identify ways in which teaching and learning can be improved. Lesson observations and subsequent discussions with senior staff and teachers should ensure that:

    • inspectors are able to judge the accuracy of the school’s evaluation of teaching and learning
    • observations are focused on issues arising from the pre-inspection briefing or from early inspection activity
    • inspectors are able to gather evidence on how well particular groups
      of pupils, as well as individuals, are learning and making progress evidence is collected so that detailed and specific recommendations can be made to improve teaching and learning."
    REFERENCE:
    Subsidiary guidance supporting the inspection of maintained schools and academies from January 2012
    Pages 12-14
    Reference no: 110166

    and.....

    Principles governing inspection feedback to teachers
    The inspection team should work to a protocol for feedback arrangements, which the lead inspector has explained to the school. Inspectors must be proactive in offering feedback to teachers.

    For all observations of 25 minutes or more, inspectors should
    offer to arrange feedback with the teacher concerned. There may be
    occasions when feedback is offered for observations of less than 25
    minutes, for example short reading/phonics sessions.
    The feedback arrangements for these sessions should be explained to the teacher prior to, or shortly after, the observation.

    Feedback dialogue should address the main strengths and weaknesses of the activity observed, focusing on:

    • pupils’ learning and the teacher’s contribution to it
    • the quality of what was seen
    • how it could be improved
    and including where possible:

    • the context and content of the lesson
    • where it fits into a sequence or programme of lessons
    • other teaching and learning activities that the teacher uses
    • professional development experience related to teaching
    • the extent to which leaders monitor teaching and provide pedagogical guidance and support for teachers
    • the nature and impact of performance management.
    REFERENCE:
    Conducting school inspections: guidance for inspectors of schools from January 201216 Dec 2011 Ofsted
    Ref: 090097
    http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/conducting-school-inspections-guidance-for-inspectors-of-schools-january-2012
     
  8. The only think that's changed is that observations get feedback after 25 minutes. It was 20 minutes in the last framework, but it wasn't in the 'conducting the inspection' document. Feedback still doesn't give advice, it gives strengths and weaknesses, and that's it.
     
  9. Mmm.
    In that case, any ideas what they mean by "evidence is collected so that detailed and specific recommendations can be made to improve teaching and learning."?
    I'm guessing you're basing your reply on more informed info, so further explanation of the above would be gladly received.
    Thanks.


     

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