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Official: "It IS the teachers' fault"

Discussion in 'Education news' started by BigFrankEM, May 7, 2019.

  1. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    BetterNow and stonerose like this.
  2. stonerose

    stonerose Occasional commenter

    agathamorse likes this.
  3. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    “The long-awaited review of exclusions in England, carried out by a former minister for children and families at the DFE Edward Timpson ...Timpson’s landmark study, which makes 30 recommendations, found huge variation across the school system. Overall, 85% of all mainstream schools did not expel a single child in 2016-7, while 47 individual secondary schools (0.2% of all schools) expelled more than 10 pupils in the same year.

    “We expect school leaders to make sure all children are getting a good education, but we must equip them with the skills and capacity to do so,”


    So who exactly is this wise MP who knows so much about English state schooling?

    Timpson was born in Knutsford in Cheshire in 1973.His father is the CEO and owner of the Timpson's chain of shoe repair and key-cutting shops, which has been in the family for five generations and has over 550 stores in the UK and Ireland. Timpson grew up with a brother, sister and over 80 children fostered by his parents.

    He was educated at Uppingham School (*) and Durham University where he studied politics before converting to law. He became a barrister in 1998. From 1999, he has practised in Chester as a family law barrister.


    (*) Uppingham Schoolis a co-educational independent school situated in the small town of Rutland England. The school was founded in 1584....The school's current Headmaster, Richard J. Maloney, is a member of the HHMC and the school is a member of the Rugby Group of independent schools in the United Kingdom.

    What could a man with this background conceivably
    not know about English state schools, I ask?
     
  4. simonCOAL

    simonCOAL Occasional commenter

    Good point.
    I went to the local comp and always worked in state schools. I know nothing about working in private education, so won’t make any comments about it.

    But perhaps I should, and make some sweeping generalisations based on hearsay and vaguely listened to gossip on social media. It seems acceptable for others, so why not us?
     
  5. Oscillatingass

    Oscillatingass Star commenter

    It is just soooo typical isn't it? Have an enquiry into a very important issue in Education and then make sure the enquiry is led by someone who knows absolutely blogger all about it. I count my blessings I am well out of Education now.
     
    lanokia, BetterNow, stonerose and 4 others like this.
  6. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    He had to come from (K)nutsford, didn't he?!
     
  7. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    I enjoy doing it about SLT! Hop on my wagon!:D:D
     
  8. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    Not being a local, I cannot possibly comment.

    However, a quick call to my ever-reliable counsellor Professor Wiki informed me that:

    "In 2005 Knutsford was named as the most expensive town to buy a house in Northern England .... There is an extremely large range [sic] of house prices in Knutsford, varying from approximately £175,000 to nearly £4,000,000 in late 2017.

    The average price is above £400,000."

    (My emphasis above)

    I bet there must be thousands of state school teachers enjoying their well earned salaries there !
     
    agathamorse, Mrsmumbles and stonerose like this.
  9. drek

    drek Lead commenter

    No more exclusions......no more teachers......perhaps the wise minister might stop reviewing and start teaching.
    Probably At a 10th of the salary for carrying out a review......surely they will be happy to fill in .......its got to be as easy as analysing data that states 2 and 2 equals 5.
     
  10. Alby

    Alby New commenter

    I was brought up a few miles from there, in a much less 'posh' part of Cheshire. We referred to it as Kuntsford. Now I know why.
     
  11. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

  12. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

  13. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    @BigFrankEM why on earth are you banging on about house prices in Knutsford and what do they have to do with the Timpson Review recommendations?

    You seem to think Timpson personally wrote the report all on his own. But in fact he led the group whose views it contains, the membership of which is listed in the report and includes 4 headteachers and the ASCL union. If you'd read the report even to the bottom of the first page you'd have seen Timpson says "...Their collective input has ensured this report incorporates not only my own views, but also the expertise and experience of those working in our schools and with children and their families".

    Nor do I know why you cut and pasted the wholly irrelevant paragraph from Wikipedia about his father and not the rather more relevant one that followed it about his work as a DFE minister for 3 years, which is why he was asked to lead the review.

    Do you have an opinion about the report's actual recommendations? (And before you ask, I don't have an opinion yet, it's 128 pages and I've only just downloaded it. I'll read it before criticising it.)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  14. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    @ "Rot Weiler"

    "A: You seem to think Timpson personally wrote the report all on his own.

    B:But in fact he led the group whose views it contains, the membership of which is listed in the report and includes 4 headteachers and the ASCL union.

    C: If you'd read the report even to the bottom of the first page you'd have seen Timpson says "...Their collective input has ensured this report incorporates not only my own views, but also the expertise and experience of those working in our schools and with children and their families"."

    +++++

    A: Please credit me with an absolute rock bottom minimum of intelligence. Do you really think I am that naive?

    B: Speaking of naiveté:

    "...membership...includes...4 headteachers...." That's impressive?
    "....and the ASCL union..." No comment !

    C: "If you'd read the report even to the bottom of the first page..."

    But I read the press summary. From which I quote extensively, now with my emphasis added:

    The education secretary, Damian Hinds, has called on headteachers in England to expel fewer pupils, as an independent study revealed that almost eight out of 10 children who are permanently excluded come from vulnerable backgrounds.

    The long-awaited review of exclusions in England, carried out by a former minister for children and families at the Department for Education, Edward Timpson, and published on Tuesday, found that 78% of expelled pupils either had special educational needs (SEN), were eligible for free school meals (FSM) or were “in need”.

    It found that boys with social, emotional and mental health difficulties were 3.8 times more likely to be permanently excluded than a child without SEN, and children from the most disadvantaged families were 45% more likely to be excluded than other pupils.

    Children from some ethnic backgrounds were also over-represented in exclusion figures. After accounting for other factors, pupils from a black Caribbean background were 1.7 times more likely to be permanently excluded than white British children, while children from Indian and Bangladeshi backgrounds were half as likely to be permanently excluded as their white peers.

    The review was broadly welcomed across the sector,...
     
  15. vjturner13

    vjturner13 New commenter

    i think that the number of pupils that have SEN is probably relevant. it shows that the behaviour policies, mental health support, understanding of child development etc. is largely misunderstood in schools and children from these backgrounds are not being represented fairly. instead they are the ones that are blamed, shamed, and finally excluded when actually if there was proper investing in supporting their needs and addressing the wider issues such as growing levels of child poverty etc. things might change. funding cuts, pressure on teachers leading to high numbers leaving the profession, a high number of student teachers with no life experience etc.. all contribute to the failing system. The really scary thing is that the kids in the system now are going to be our tomorrow!!
     
  16. BetterNow

    BetterNow Occasional commenter

    It was all over sky news the other week. The poor excluded students. The dreadful state schools who throw them out to fend for themselves. The valiant PRUs taking on these poor excluded students and turning their lives around...

    Ignoring the obvious. I’m going into classes of 30-36, where there can be 2-3 students who just make classes a misery for everyone. Sometimes they are a danger to others. There can be very, very few state schools that haven’t tried everything to keep these children in the school.

    PRUs can have 6 students or fewer in the classes. They can spend the time to do the playing-of-pool, the cooking, the playing of games that large state schools can’t. They can take time to give students breakfast; to allow students to have some much needed sleep; to choose to delay a lesson to fit social and emotional, as well as academic needs.

    Excluding students isn’t necessarily failing them. It’s saving the rest of the class in the state school and it’s saving the student who needs all the PRU can offer. Different set ups, working together for the benefit of all.

    Maybe we need to rethink 'exclusion'. Maybe we need to see it as meeting specific needs.
     
    agathamorse, Jamvic and bessiesmith like this.
  17. ATfan

    ATfan Star commenter

    Especially with the name of a school which is no doubt close to where his head spends most of his time run by a person with a name which rhymes with what I think of his verdict! :)
     
  18. Jamvic

    Jamvic Senior commenter

    Amen to that.
     
  19. baitranger

    baitranger Occasional commenter

    Yes, collect the most badly behaved pupils in the local area , make a class of 30 out of them and force the minister to teach them five hours a day for one school year. He will not be allowed to exclude any of them and will have to devise interesting and engaging lessons ( fully differentiated, of course) . Any bad behaviour will be his fault for not inspiring them with his teaching. All to be videoed and shown on national TV every day.
     
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