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Off with stress what are my options

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by Un_lucky, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. I have just joined the forum in hope of some help from people with experience.

    I am an NQT in a good school but have just not been able to find my feet in upper KS2. I have had good observations but I find I work all hours and still fail to do all the work that is expected of me. Most of my colleagues are very experienced working in the school for many years and they just know what to do. I have felt that their expectations of me are too high and having said this they respond with 'this is what teaching is, deal with it'.

    After a particularly bad meeting with my mentor I felt I couldn't take any more and have just been signed off with stress for 4 weeks. I really don't want to go back to school but I'm not sure what my options are. I was employed on a one year contract from September and have completed 1 and a half terms of induction.

    Like I said I just don't want to go back, I feel very uncomfortable in the school with a number of teachers scrutinising my work. I hate the person i have become outside of school and feel I need to reassess my situation. I guess my question is can I resign whist on the sick? I know that it is usually one terms notice but I just do not want to go back.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. I have just joined the forum in hope of some help from people with experience.

    I am an NQT in a good school but have just not been able to find my feet in upper KS2. I have had good observations but I find I work all hours and still fail to do all the work that is expected of me. Most of my colleagues are very experienced working in the school for many years and they just know what to do. I have felt that their expectations of me are too high and having said this they respond with 'this is what teaching is, deal with it'.

    After a particularly bad meeting with my mentor I felt I couldn't take any more and have just been signed off with stress for 4 weeks. I really don't want to go back to school but I'm not sure what my options are. I was employed on a one year contract from September and have completed 1 and a half terms of induction.

    Like I said I just don't want to go back, I feel very uncomfortable in the school with a number of teachers scrutinising my work. I hate the person i have become outside of school and feel I need to reassess my situation. I guess my question is can I resign whist on the sick? I know that it is usually one terms notice but I just do not want to go back.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. Kate001

    Kate001 New commenter

    You could resign but would be extremely lucky to find another job, especially in primary teaching. Consider work as a TA or HLTA?
    If you don't want to go back, don't and move on to something new. Or go back, stick it out and appy for new jobs.
     
  4. Are you saying that resigning would be a black mark against me for the future? Do people not resign because of sickness without returning to work their notice.
     
  5. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Teaching is very competitive. Even supply is hard to pick up so the last thing you want to do is resign from a post, unless you are unlikely to pass induction. Your best chance of a job in a school that suits you better is to do your best where you are, apply for other jobs and get induction completed. If you left your present post now, it would indeed ring alarm bells for other schools. If you don't want to teach again, you've nothing but the salary to lose. But if you want to stay in teaching, you be better off getting your induction done while you are able to do so. If you really feel your health is so affected that you cannot go back, perhaps you should get some union support. If it's just that you would rather not go back, but get another job, think very carefully before giving notice, as you risk being unemployed for a long time.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    There is no time limit to complete Induction!
    You can take as long as you like to complete Induction.
    There used to be an expectation that an NQT woudl complete Induction within 5 yrs of starting Induction but that was abolished in Sept 2007.
    There is a 16 month supply limit (with a possible 12 months extension) but the OP hasn't even started that yet as their first qualified teaching has been part of Induction. If they left the post before completing Induction and took work lasting anything from a day to just under a term's length (so not part of Induction) the supply 16 month clock would start counting down and they'd run out of the ability to take such work when the 16 month (and any extension granted) expired. They'd then need Induction work for their next teaching in the State 5-16 sector but could have an employment gap of weeks, months or years before getting that Induction work.
    I'm glad the OP has decided to be cautious and take stock of the situation when they've had a chance to benefit from the sick leave.
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I assumed the OP would want to be doing supply teaching while looking for another post. Hence there is a time limit and, as it is very hard to get a post when a supply teacher who left their induction post prematurely, the 16 months goes very, very quickly. There are a great many posts all the time on Jobseekers and the NQT forum with people in a huge panic. Add to not earning very much at all when supply is scarce, leaving is very much an absolute last resort.

    Sorry I didn't make this clear.
     

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