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OCR Nationals - Copyright free text?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by gavcradd, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    Just looking through the assessment criteria for the OCR Nationals, Unit 1...part of the merit / distinction criteria (A02) states that pupils must "download graphic and text files in compliance with current copyright legislation".

    Now, the sample assignment given on the OCR website for the Downloadable Tunes business states that "The information gathered should be copyright-free text and graphics which will be used to promote the Downloadable Tunes music business in a
    newsletter".

    Can I ask what exactly everyone else is getting their pupils to download to meet this? I'm OK with getting images using copyright free websites (e.g. freefoto.com), but I'm really struggling to find any suitable text that could be used that isn't controlled by copyright.

    It's my understanding that everything on the net is copyrighted to the author unless explicity stated otherwise, or unless permission has been given.

    Am I being too picky? I'd be really interested to hear about what other people are doing, especially if you've already been moderated and passed.
     
  2. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    Just looking through the assessment criteria for the OCR Nationals, Unit 1...part of the merit / distinction criteria (A02) states that pupils must "download graphic and text files in compliance with current copyright legislation".

    Now, the sample assignment given on the OCR website for the Downloadable Tunes business states that "The information gathered should be copyright-free text and graphics which will be used to promote the Downloadable Tunes music business in a
    newsletter".

    Can I ask what exactly everyone else is getting their pupils to download to meet this? I'm OK with getting images using copyright free websites (e.g. freefoto.com), but I'm really struggling to find any suitable text that could be used that isn't controlled by copyright.

    It's my understanding that everything on the net is copyrighted to the author unless explicity stated otherwise, or unless permission has been given.

    Am I being too picky? I'd be really interested to hear about what other people are doing, especially if you've already been moderated and passed.
     
  3. I have had mine to collect non-copyright text as research and then create their own text based on what they have found out. The collected material is clearly acknowledged. This, as I understand it, is not in breach of copyright law. A statement such as "I can only use this text for research because it is copyrighted" would show an awareness.

    The mark scheme says they will "copy and paste" or "download graphic and text files"..." in compliance with current copyright legislation. It does not say that they have to be copyright free.

    Does this make sense.

    Perhaps we should find out from someone who has been moderated.
     
  4. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    Thanks for that - like you say, it would be really good for anyone who has been moderated to quickly post a comment to say what they did.

    Anyone???
     
  5. tonyuk

    tonyuk Occasional commenter

    Prsonally when we have done it we have put some information on our website that we have composed and then the pupils have downloaded it with a tsatement form us that it is copyright free.
     
  6. Try wikipedia on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Copyrights

    You can usually find information about most things on this site and for what we want it for it's free of copyright are you do not need permission to use them as per the statement below.

    "The permissions to reproduce Wikipedia's content in accordance with these conditions are granted without request."

    I do not see any problems with using anything from the wikipedia site for academic research (or use).

    Also try the BBC site. They state you can use content of their site as long as it is for your own personal, non-commercial use (quote below) which to me is school coursework.

    "You also agree not to adapt, alter or create a derivative work from any bbc.co.uk content except for your own personal, non-commercial use."

    I also saw something on the Thomas Telford website that provided a link to a leaflet which stated that small amounts of information for private or academic use were allowed under copyright legislation.

    If anyone knows the link to this I would appreciate the link being posted as as far as I am concerned this allows school students to use anything they like (with an acknowledgement) as it is for school.

    I have also seen, (somewhere in the past), that anything posted on a US Government site is classed as being in the public domain. If it is in the public domain then there are no issues with copyright. (Please check this before use though as I would hate your students to have problems because I was wrong).

    I am not a solicitor/barrister/lawyer so I may be wrong but as long as they acknowledge it (and state it is for school use) I do not see any problems with using snippets from any site on the net.

     
  7. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    Ah, but there's a problem with saying it's OK as it's for schoolwork - the project revolves around a business selling MP3s on the internet. The pictures and text that are needed would be used in a newsletter presumably advertising the business.

    Therefore, if we're really getting the kids into role as the techno geeks for the business then they shouldn't use stuff that says not for commercial use.

    I completely agree about it being OK to use snippets as long as they reference them, but I'm having trouble finding out where it says that so I can make sure they hit he marks for copyright with OCR.
     
  8. Role playing does not matter. It may be that you are trying to get your students into role and they cannot use stuff for commercial use, but it isn't for commercial use. It's for a school project and nothing else.

    I do not see a problem with this as long as your students acknowledge that use is acceptable in these circumstances.

    If you read The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, Section 32, (3), it states that

    "Copyright is not infringed by anything done for the purposes of an examination by way of setting the questions, communicating the questions to the candidates or answering the questions."

    I would assume, (remember I have no legal training), that an OCR assessment could effectively be classed as an examination and the candidate is answering the question. I do not see that OCR can disagree with English Law, (it may be different in Scotland), and if this is quoted, a moderator should not be able to disagree with this. As long as students are aware of these issues and put some sort of reference to this I do not see how they can be marked down or do OCR class themselves above the Law. The best way to check this would be a comment from OCR to this post so please post a reply if you are an OCR moderator.

    As an endnote, I have loads of trouble getting my students to admit that copyright exists. They usually believe if it is on the internet it's free. I am currently looking for some software to convert mobile phone video to flash and they are full of suggestions. They do not see a problem with installing software which costs money. I usually get ?try Limewire or Bitcommet? as they tend to think as it is on the internet then it is free to use.
     
  9. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    Good post - I have exactly the same problems, but they're slowly coming round after I refuse to accept their work for the 18th time because of the pictures of Bart Simpson all over it...

    I've emailed OCR anyway so I'll let everyone know what they say (if they reply!)
     
  10. Yes, but if OCR want them to address copyright issues, then according to CDP Act 1998, if they show they understand that it is normally wrong to copy work but in this case as long as they reference its use AND acknowledge source then for academic use it should be OK.

    I have made students send emails to site owners asking for permission though as even though I am suggesting OCR would struggle to argue copyright has not been addressed if the CDP Act is quoted, I am just making sure.

    I have seen emails from site owners giving permission to use their images and text for schoolwork as long at is not commercial, so even though I am arguing 1 point of view, I am making sure.

    Cheers
     
  11. Just wondering if anyone had got any more ideas on this old thread as it just seems to have stopped with no conclusion.

    I am currently really struggling getting the pupils to find any "copyright free" text or images on music downloads or bands or the latest albums or singles.

    When you do an advanced search on google and change the usage rights to "free to use or share, even commercially" it comes up with nothing of use even if you put in quite a well known band such as The Beatles.

    Also does any one know if "Locate suitable text and images on local media eg CD ROM" means get info from actual cd albums from groups eg Razorlight (which would be copyrighted) or from things like cd encylcopedias eg Brittania (which again would surely be copyrighted).

    Also how many singles and albums are people getting their kids to find information on?

    I would of contacted OCR but cant find out how to do this from their website!

     
  12. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    I emailed OCR and they were incredibly helpful - I can't remember the guy's name, but he was a high up examiner and he emailed me back a detailed response. He even went as far as to give me the web link for his daughter's band and to say that I could use the text and pictures off there with his permission!

    The essence of his response was what we'd already decided on here really - try your best to get true copyright free stuff, if you can't find it then ask permission and save the emails, etc. If all else fails, simply state in the project that it's OK by copyright laws as it's a school project, but if it were a commercial project then you'd have to do x y and z.

    I think OCR, along with the other exam boards, are being forced to include copyright issues.

    Compare the above customer service with any you've received from Edexcel...
     
  13. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

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