1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice
  3. The Teacher Q&A will be closing soon.

    If you have any information that you would like to keep or refer to in the future please can you copy and paste the information to a format suitable for you to save or take screen shots of the questions and responses you are interested in.

    Don’t forget you can still use the rest of the forums on theTes Community to post questions and get the advice, help and support you require from your peers for all your teaching needs.

    Dismiss Notice

OCR F966 Changing Nature of Warfare

Discussion in 'History' started by yellowledbetter, May 18, 2011.

  1. Hello all,

    I'm about to start teaching OCR F966 Changing Nature of Warfare 1792-1914 when my Y12s return in a few weeks' time. I was wondering if anyone had any tips/schemes of work/useful resources that I could shamelessly look at? I've never taught this topic before (and the departmental SOW is quite thin) and while I understand it needs to be approached thematically in the exam, I'm not sure whether to teach chronologically and pull out themes as we go along, or teach across the themes, if that makes sense? My HOD is also quite unfamiliar with this as we changed to OCR recently.
    I am looking to go on a course next academic year but I have about four weeks of teaching time between the students returning and the end of term, and want to get them off to the best possible start.

    Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated - anything at all!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Hello all,

    I'm about to start teaching OCR F966 Changing Nature of Warfare 1792-1914 when my Y12s return in a few weeks' time. I was wondering if anyone had any tips/schemes of work/useful resources that I could shamelessly look at? I've never taught this topic before (and the departmental SOW is quite thin) and while I understand it needs to be approached thematically in the exam, I'm not sure whether to teach chronologically and pull out themes as we go along, or teach across the themes, if that makes sense? My HOD is also quite unfamiliar with this as we changed to OCR recently.
    I am looking to go on a course next academic year but I have about four weeks of teaching time between the students returning and the end of term, and want to get them off to the best possible start.

    Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated - anything at all!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  3. MarkJH

    MarkJH New commenter

    I taught this once before we moved from OCR (not being funny but what reasons did you have for moving TO OCR?). Military History is my specialism. I taught it chronologically and brought out the themes as I went along. Teaching it 'theme by theme' might possibly be better , as it would tend to steer students away from the 'one war after another' approach to answering questions and encourage synopticity. The Stewart 'Access to History' book is good, but doesn't cover the optional American Civil War which I think is very important in understanding the development of warfare in this period-a classic debate being 'Was the ACW the first modern war or the last Napoleonic one?' The other book available for this module, by Browning, is not as user-friendly overall but does cover the ACW. I would recommend a book by my old university superviosr 'European Armies and the Conduct of War', ichael Howard's 'War in European History' and 'Forward Into Battle' by my late friend Paddy Griffith as good additional works.
    I used quite a lot of AV material. The trouble with most feature film recreations of conflict is that they are completely inaccurate but there are a couple of sequences in 'Waterloo' which can be used to illustrate tactics, notably the French cavalry attack swarming around the British squares. The battle sequences in the rather long-winded epic 'Gettysburg', by contrast, are very accurately staged if you allow for the lack of gore, the plethora of all too-obviously fake moustaches and beards and the presence of rather too many portly, over-age re-enactors filling up the ranks! I used the two climactic scenes of the defence of Little Round Top and Pickett's Charge to illustrate salient features of ACW combat.
    For the First World War there is abundant material available. Particularly valuable for this module is a 'Timewatch' programme looking at changing technologies' influence on the war (including barbed wire and tinned food). I also used the 2006 BBC Docu-Drama 'The Somme: From Defeat to Victory' which challenges the myth of unchanging British tactics and weapons during the First World War.
     
  4. MarkJH

    MarkJH New commenter

    Sorry, not being able to edit posts on this board is a pain:
    'European Armies...' is by Hew Strachan. Sir Michael Howard wrote 'War in European History'.
     
  5. MarkJH

    MarkJH New commenter

    A further thought. I'm sure that you are aware of this, but the terminal dates for the unit are 1792-1945, not 1914 as you put in your original post!
     
  6. Haha yes I did realise that but couldn't edit it! Brain fudged after long week! Thanks for that - really useful. My main concern was whether to teach it chronologically or thematically, as a friend who teaches the Russia synoptic unit always teaches it chronologically and recommended that I do so. I'll check out those resources. And regarding OCR....had a bad experience with AQA and HOD wanted to switch. Saying that, not sure that OCR seem any better - they've been useless with support for the AS this year!
     


  7. 12.00



    Normal
    0




    false
    false
    false

    EN-GB
    X-NONE
    X-NONE













    MicrosoftInternetExplorer4



























































































































































    /* Style Definitions */
    table.MsoNormalTable
    {mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
    mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
    mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
    mso-style-noshow:yes;
    mso-style-priority:99;
    mso-style-qformat:yes;
    mso-style-parent:"";
    mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
    mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
    mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
    mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
    mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
    line-height:115%;
    mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
    font-size:11.0pt;
    font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
    mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
    mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
    mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
    mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}




    Having taught this in the past (we are with a different exam
    board now, but I teach a similar course for IB ) I would completely agree with
    Mark’s suggestions. Once extra thing
    that I found that helped the students on this course was for them to create a
    timeline on a long wall board which made
    them familiar with the chronology, they
    then added details of new technologies / tactics etc as they studied them. The
    Timewatch ‘War Revolution’ programme was excellent for this; but I’m biased on that count!
     
  8. MarkJH

    MarkJH New commenter

    Not wishing to worry you but we moved from OCR after years of bad experiences with inexplicable marking (particularly on the coursework and source papers) and poor support. It didn't seem to get any better on the new Spec A.
     
  9. Thanks everyone - this has been really useful advice!

    Re: Mark - fully aware of OCR's weaknesses! We had some rubbish marks last year but it was in the essay paper rather than source paper and we've marked/moderated the coursework this year quite harshly so as to avoid disappointments, although not that it guarantees it. Who are you with now? HOD wants to move to Edexcel but have heard terrible things about them too!
     

Share This Page