1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Observed Lesson Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Music' started by baileyclarke02, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. Hello everyone!

    I have an observed lesson coming up (I?m still a student), and just not sure what angle to go down, so would really appreciate any ideas that have worked well in the past for you. It?s a 1st year class, they are currently doing guitar and drum kit (I teach each topic in a separate lesson). They struggle a bit with guitar, and I find it challenging teaching whole class activities with only one drum kit (have done lots of body percussion etc).

    Any ideas for anything within drum/ guitar topics you have found successful? Or, am I better to do my own thing, say on the pentatonic scale, riffs etc, using any instruments the pupils want to play?

    Any help would be fantastic as I?m suddenly having a major mind blank...!


    Thanks
     
  2. Hello everyone!

    I have an observed lesson coming up (I?m still a student), and just not sure what angle to go down, so would really appreciate any ideas that have worked well in the past for you. It?s a 1st year class, they are currently doing guitar and drum kit (I teach each topic in a separate lesson). They struggle a bit with guitar, and I find it challenging teaching whole class activities with only one drum kit (have done lots of body percussion etc).

    Any ideas for anything within drum/ guitar topics you have found successful? Or, am I better to do my own thing, say on the pentatonic scale, riffs etc, using any instruments the pupils want to play?

    Any help would be fantastic as I?m suddenly having a major mind blank...!


    Thanks
     
  3. cmf

    cmf



    Honestly! Dont do anything practical, stay with the theory/history side. I had one a few weeks back and got the dreaded (Unsatisfactory!!!!) so I am now on the hit list and have to "prove" I can teach an "Observed" lesson. They have me working on everything. 4/5 page lesson plans, making sure the students hit the lesson objectives, VARK, lesson outcomes, timmings and all this due to the fact it was a practical lesson and the staff member couldnt see what was going on as they were far too intent on the tick boxes. Students were "independant learners", students engrosed in playing etc so missed out the plenary, which came at the start of the next lesson anyway. <u>Teach an observed lesson</u>, do not make the same error I did and teach as normal. Make sure of the 3 part lesson with objectives which ALL students can hit. Make reference to them and VARK and NC levels and dont forget the plenary. I feel so much under pressure I now hate my job and all for teaching a normal lesson! All students gained from the lesson but that does not count for the little piece of paper with all the tick boxes on it.
     
  4. Oh dear cmf, that sounds like a nightmare! I think having pupils doing practical work in an observed lesson can be a good thing, as you say, they enjoy it and can explore the topic you are teaching and understand it more through music making. Maybe it's a question of balance; ensuring they understand what they're supposed to be playing, that it's linked with the start of the lesson, and maybe that there are key checks on their learning throughout the lesson. For example, getting a group, or even the whole class to play what they have done mid-point as an example of 'work in progress'. Observed lessons are tricky ones for sure, as many seasoned teachers say, it is a little bit like a 'show' lesson, whereas it should really be a reflection of a normal music lesson.
     
  5. bessiesmith

    bessiesmith New commenter

    It's a shame if a non-specialist doesn't appreciate what a good music lesson should look like. As the OP is a student though I assume the observer will be either the class music teacher or PGCE subject tutor so it should be OK. When I have students to mentor, I definitely want to see that they are capable of managing a practical session as that is one of the key skills necessary to become an effective music teacher.
    What aspect of rhythm are you hoping to teach them? I start with the concept of the beat - listen to some different pieces of music and get them to clap along in time to the beat. Divide the class into three groups - bass, snare, hi-hat and get them to perform as a human drum kit - with you conducting the beat. Then you could get them in smaller groups to create a 4-beat rhythmic ostinato they could perform to the class - rest of the class join in when they've got it. Then...depends on what you've already done...4 or 8 beat improvisations round the class over your piano riff work quite well. I often use the drum tone on the keyboards and get them to learn to play a standard rock beat - that gets around not having enough drum kits.

     
  6. Thanks for your suggestions, and apologies for not getting back to you sooner, have had a crazy week! I really like the idea of a whole class human drum kit, and inventing rhythmic ostinatos. All great ideas that I?ll use in my teaching!
     

Share This Page