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Observed lesson in French! Non Specialist

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by missRV, May 2, 2012.

  1. missRV

    missRV Occasional commenter

    I've just found out that I have an observed lesson with my head teacher in 6 weeks time, I teach in a special needs school. The group are year 9 but chronologically at year 4 level. It's a small class of 7 pupils with 4 with Autism, 2 with MLD and 1 with severe behavioural problems.

    They will have finished their entry level assessment so I am pretty much free to do any topic with them but I would really appreciate any ideas. Up to now I have been using the pre made lessons from rigolo but I've never been observed with them.

    I have A level french so I can speak the language.

    Any ideas at all would be fantastic.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. missRV

    missRV Occasional commenter

    I've just found out that I have an observed lesson with my head teacher in 6 weeks time, I teach in a special needs school. The group are year 9 but chronologically at year 4 level. It's a small class of 7 pupils with 4 with Autism, 2 with MLD and 1 with severe behavioural problems.

    They will have finished their entry level assessment so I am pretty much free to do any topic with them but I would really appreciate any ideas. Up to now I have been using the pre made lessons from rigolo but I've never been observed with them.

    I have A level french so I can speak the language.

    Any ideas at all would be fantastic.

    Thanks :)
     
  3. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I think I'd do something on food shopping.
    Do you have stocks of plastic fruit and veg and empty packets of food/drink bottles etc?
    The starter could be them copying out name and price labels for the stall or writing a shopping list that can act as an aide -meoire when they become customers.
    You could be the shopkeeper who greets each customer and hopefully gets a greeting back.
    They then say "je voudrias un /deux etc or 2 kilos de or un paquet de..." and put selected items in their carrier bag/basket.
    Toy Euro coins/notes would be useful for the monetary exchange.
    They then return to their places and draw pictures of everthing they bought, labelling them and writing sentences if possible.
     
  4. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    The Olympics?
     
  5. You must be exceptional, RV - practically no one with A level French speaks a language that would be recognised across the channel (except with a smile). Even people with 'degrees' are often dubious
    My suggestion: do an easy speaking exercise that requires active participation from every member of the class, keep it simple, and don't use any English. Then you'll 'prove the pudding'

     
  6. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    I disagree with this statement. My AS students can express themselves reasonably well, thank you very much!
    It's hard enough to convince people in this country that instead of rubbishing whatever qualification they have in a foreign language, they should try to make an effort to use the little they have learned when they have the opportunity, but if teachers start rubbishing them as well, what hope do we have?
    OP, if you'd like some "instructions" phrases for routine actions in the classroom, PM me.
     
  7. Well, it depends, doesn't it. My AS students who are E or D candidates don't speak the language, really, but my A grade students are fine (although I am still amazed at the basic mistakes they make, after 7 years of German).
    The problem is just the fact that the way languages have to be taught here are a bit rubbish, especially at GCSE level. Not the teachers' fault, they have to play the game.....



     

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